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A Short History of Nearly Everything

Bryson, Bill (Book - 2003)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Short History of Nearly Everything
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In this book Bill Bryson explores the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer and attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. To that end, Bill Bryson apprenticed himself to a host of the world's most profound scientific minds, living and dead. His challenge is to take subjects like geology, chemistry, paleontology, astronomy, and particle physics and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people, like himself, made bored (or scared) stiff of science by school. His interest is not simply to discover what we know but to find out how we know it. How do we know what is in the center of the earth, thousands of miles beneath the surface? How can we know the extent and the composition of the universe, or what a black hole is? How can we know where the continents were 600 million years ago? How did anyone ever figure these things out? On his travels through space and time, Bill Bryson encounters a splendid gallery of the most fascinating, eccentric, competitive, and foolish personalities ever to ask a hard question. In their company, he undertakes a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge.
Authors: Bryson, Bill
Title: A short history of nearly everything
Publisher: New York : Broadway Books, 2003
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: ix, 544 p. ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Bill Bryson
Contents: Lost in the cosmos: How to build a universe ; Welcome to the solar system ; The Reverend Evans's universe
The size of the earth: The measure of things ; The stone-breakers ; Science red in tooth and claw ; Elemental matters
A new age dawns: Einstein's universe ; The mighty atom ; Getting the lead out ; Muster Mark's quarks ; Earth moves
Dangerous planet: Bang! ; The fire below ; Dangerous beauty
Life itself: Lonely planet ; Into the troposphere ; The bounding main ; The rise of life ; Small world ; Life goes on ; Good-bye to all that ; The richness of being ; Cells ; Darwin's singular notion ; The stuff of life
The road to us: Ice time ; The mysterious biped ; The restless ape ; Good-bye
Summary: In this book Bill Bryson explores the most intriguing and consequential questions that science seeks to answer and attempts to understand everything that has transpired from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization. To that end, Bill Bryson apprenticed himself to a host of the world's most profound scientific minds, living and dead. His challenge is to take subjects like geology, chemistry, paleontology, astronomy, and particle physics and see if there isn't some way to render them comprehensible to people, like himself, made bored (or scared) stiff of science by school. His interest is not simply to discover what we know but to find out how we know it. How do we know what is in the center of the earth, thousands of miles beneath the surface? How can we know the extent and the composition of the universe, or what a black hole is? How can we know where the continents were 600 million years ago? How did anyone ever figure these things out? On his travels through space and time, Bill Bryson encounters a splendid gallery of the most fascinating, eccentric, competitive, and foolish personalities ever to ask a hard question. In their company, he undertakes a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge.
ISBN: 9780767908184
076790818X
0767908171
9780767908177
096573840X
9780965738408
Branch Call Number: 500 B916s 2003
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. 517-527) and index
Subject Headings: Science Popular works
Topical Term: Science
LCCN: 2003046006
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A renowned travel writer brings complex scientific concepts to life by describing how the universe and life as we know it came to be.


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Even if you are not into science or technology, you will 'love' this book. Bill Bryson's writing style is incredible and charming, as usual....

Aug 14, 2013
  • KRockstar10 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

If you want to crack up while reading about cells, get a little worried about volcanic activity, and learn about the many quirks that famous scientists of the past have had, this book is excellent. I giggled and texted quotes to people every time I sat down to read.

Jul 28, 2013
  • biblioisseur rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

One of my favorite books. It is such a fun read. It is one one of the very few non-reference books I own.

Jun 12, 2013
  • oldhag rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book is neither short, nor does it cover everything, but it is an enjoyable read about developments in different fields of science, and the mad/genius people who did/do populate the scientific arena.

Sep 07, 2012
  • tocch101 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A good read with interesting prospective that anyone can read. Great for an overall history.

I basically skimmed through this book and this "A Short History of Nearly Everything" is pretty much a short history of nearly everything in the western world. It does not really explore other milestones, achievements or important facts of the rest of the world from Africa to Asia or early America. After seeing this I did not bother to read into it because my opinion was that the book is biased if it covers only a small portion of the world and claims that to be a short history of nearly Everything. It Is NOT.

Sep 29, 2011
  • giddyleu rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

At last, a science book most of us can read and understand. Very witty. He makes you feel the wonder of the world we live in.

May 02, 2011
  • Delta rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A Short History of Nearly Everything is a fabulous book. A must read for anyone who is interested in the science of how the world works. Read this book, it's mind expanding.

Mar 30, 2011
  • bookpatty rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Mind blowing!!

Mar 04, 2011
  • lilwordworm rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I love science books that are also well written. It satisfies both sides of me. This book is especially good because it also satisfies my extremely short attention span. Bored of atoms? Then let's talk about some dinosaurs. Note though, since each section is really short, you are not going to ace your bio/chem/physics exam just by reading this intro to it but it's good fun.

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Jul 28, 2013
  • biblioisseur rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

biblioisseur thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Aug 26, 2010
  • BlackPhoenix rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

BlackPhoenix thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

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Mar 10, 2008
  • m4t4 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

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app04 Version Arkelstorp Last updated 2014/10/16 16:30