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A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

Smith, Betty (Book - 2001 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn


Item Details

A poignant tale of childhood and the ties of family, "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" will transport the reader to the early 1900s where a little girl named Francie dreamily looks out her window at a tree struggling to reach the sky.
Authors: Smith, Betty, 1896-1972
Title: A tree grows in Brooklyn
Publisher: New York :, HarperCollins Publishers,, c2001
Characteristics: xi, 493 p. ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Betty Smith ; with a foreword by Anna Quindlen
Summary: A poignant tale of childhood and the ties of family, "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn" will transport the reader to the early 1900s where a little girl named Francie dreamily looks out her window at a tree struggling to reach the sky.
ISBN: 0060001941
9780060001940
Branch Call Number: FICTION SMITH 2001
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Report This Sep 27, 2013
  • Eil_1 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

My brother saw the movie and urged me to see it. Instead I was able to rent it from the library. A family with challenges and told through the eyes of the daughter. Although written decades ago, it is a wonderful story.

Report This Jul 11, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This book shows the struggle and hardships needed to obtain the american dream.

Report This Apr 21, 2013
  • bibliomutti rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

After "To Kill a Mockingbird", this is my favourite novel written by an American. Although, obviously, I read it years after its initial publication, I still identified strongly with the protagonist and her story. Very powerful - surprisingly contemporary at times.

Report This Feb 04, 2013
  • blolo rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I really liked this book. Aside from the "coming from nothing" story line, so many of the themes in this book are universally relatable. All of the characters have flaws, but they have redeeming qualities as well. It was so well written, heart-warming and accessible. It strikes me as a book that was really ahead of its time. A lovely read.

Report This Dec 27, 2012
  • Rubicat rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Excellent for ages 10-15, especially girls (which is when I first read it) as an adult, I found it sentimental. It is well written, but such a morality, "pull yourself up by your bootstraps and always have faith and hope" tale that I sorta made me gag. That's not to say I wasn't pulled into the story - I certainly was. I just can't recommend this as good reading for adults.

Report This Sep 08, 2012
  • kozakd rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I so loved this book in 1975 as a teenager and am happy to see readers are still finding and enjoying it.

Report This Jul 09, 2012
  • nadia9 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This is an intriguing book. It captivates you about the 1920s in Brooklyn.

Report This Jun 16, 2012
  • Lindas777 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

The Orleans Outrageous book club read this book in May 2012. I found this a great story and I enjoyed reading it. Some of the other members were going to check out other books by the author.

Report This Aug 14, 2011
  • huskyd0ggy rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

My FAVORITE book of all time. I read it my Senior year of high school, and I am still raving about this book. I loved how this book really put me in my place in terms of humbleness and thankfulness. This book made me dream wonderful thoughts, cry along with the characters, and laugh during the ridiculous parts. This book is more than meets the eye. Prepare to be blown away.

Report This Jun 07, 2011
  • DeltaQueen50 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This book is, I believe, an American treasure. A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith is the quintessential coming-of-age story for young girls. Francie Nolan’s difficult childhood growing up in the early 1900’s in the slums of Brooklyn resonates with pride, resourcefulness, and heart. We are given an in-depth look at a small slice of American life in the early part of the twentieth century. Francie’s life is difficult, the less favoured child of a remote mother, having a drunken, musical father who is many things but never a wage-earner, she is growing up as a tenement child, dirty, hungry and ragged. She wins our hearts with her determination to flourish and grow. As the tree outside her window manages to survive in difficult conditions so does Francie overcome her poverty and neglect. How can you not fall in love with this little girl, who vows to herself to read a book a day. Although Francie is the main character, we are rewarded with many other well developed, real people. From her loveable, loose, people-smart Aunt Sissy to her complex, hard-working strong mother, each character has their own identity and fills the pages of the book with their stories. Written in a straight forward, deceptively simple manner, the author gives so much heart and soul to Francie that the reader can’t help but be carried away by her story. The book is filled with many beautiful, thoughtful moments where Francie’s feelings and reflections on her life are expressed vividly. A Tree Grows In Brooklyn is a book for generations to enjoy, both hopeful and uplifting, a rich and rewarding read.

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Report This Jul 11, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

platypus101 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Report This May 03, 2011
  • rhonda65 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

rhonda65 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

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Report This Jul 11, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

The title of this novel refers to a tree that grows persistently up through the concrete and harsh conditions of a poor tenement neighborhood in early 1900s Brooklyn. But it is also a metaphor for the novel's protagonist, Francie Nolan. She is a sweet, innocent girl who grows and flourishes despite a harsh environment of neglect and poverty.

This novel centers on Francie Nolan's coming-of-age in 1910s and 1920s Brooklyn. Francie starts the novel as a poor 11-year-old girl who loves to read with an alcoholic father who she feels she understands and vice versa. They are both sentimental and talented. Francie's breadwinning mother does not have as healthy as a relationship with her daughter - she favors Francie's younger brother and "always has to have the last word." The novel is character-centric, and has little semblance of a plot

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