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Millicent Min, Girl Genius

Yee, Lisa (Book - 2003 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
Millicent Min, Girl Genius


Item Details

In a series of journal entries, eleven-year-old child prodigy Millicent Min records her struggles to learn to play volleyball, tutor her enemy, deal with her grandmother's departure, and make friends over the course of a tumultuous summer.
Authors: Yee, Lisa
Title: Millicent Min, girl genius
Publisher: New York :, Arthur A. Levine Books,, c2003
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: 248 p. ;,22 cm
Statement of Responsibility: by Lisa Yee
Summary: In a series of journal entries, eleven-year-old child prodigy Millicent Min records her struggles to learn to play volleyball, tutor her enemy, deal with her grandmother's departure, and make friends over the course of a tumultuous summer.
ISBN: 0439425190
9780439425193
0439425204
9780439425209
Branch Call Number: j YEE
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Report This Dec 01, 2013
  • Cali7766 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I love this book!!! Now it has become my favourite book!!!

Report This Aug 04, 2011
  • LINDA TAN rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I like this book series because the author wrote it in different point of views. For example, in So Totally, Emily Ebers, she wrote Stanford is an athletic, smart boy. But in this book, she wrote that Stanford is a geek, stupid boy. I love this book, and I rate it five stars!!!!

Report This Nov 22, 2010
  • Tilda rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book's bright cover and slightly goofy photo suggested it would be a humorous take on real life. I also liked the title - but I had thought that "girl genius" was probably meant ironically. As it turns out, Millicent is actually a real genius. My own misconception aside, this book delivered what I was looking for. It's a realistic but not too angst-y account of life as an early teen and all of the challenges of making friends while still being true to yourself. The story is told from Millicent's perspective and this keeps the tone funny and engaging because, despite (and in many ways because of) her high IQ, Millicent is often clueless and unintuitive about the feeling and motives of other people. Millicent is eager to make friends and most of the book is about her current and remembered difficulties in making a connection with other people her age. The other teenagers in the book, Emily and Stanford, are a little more typical in their interests then Miilicent but this book shows that there is as much value in their interests, ideas and opinions. Millicent may have a lot of smarts and intellectual skills but the "non-geniuses" in this book are way ahead of her in some areas of life. (There are other books by Lisa Yee that tell this story from their perspectives: "Stanford Wong Flunks Big-time" and "So Totally Emily Ebers".) This is an easily enjoyed book that doesn't get too heavy but is also pretty pragmatic about life. I think it would be a good book for readers between eleven and fifteen. Because Millicent has a lot of "genius" interests, Yee writes about a lot of music, math and books that adults don't normally talk to young people about. There are some topics that you may not have encountered before but being introduced to them is preferable to being talked down to by a writer who assumes that teens aren't curious about the world or aren't interested in challenging concepts.

Report This Oct 22, 2009
  • rosepetal16 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

This is a really good book! She is an amazing person. This book is all about lies. Although this is really well written, I like the other two books, STANFORD WONG FLUNKS BIG TIME and SO TOTALLY EMILY EBERS.

i havent actually read this book yet, but it sounds great!!

Report This Nov 16, 2005
  • AdrienneC rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Mililcent Min is 11 years old and has just finished the 11th grade. A genius, she is anticipating a fun(?) summer, in which she''ll take her first college-level course. However, her mother has other plans: she enrolls her in a volleyball league (Millicent has never played before) and also arranges for her to tutor Stanford Wong, a boy who is interested in basketball and nothing else. When Millicent develops a friendship with Emily -- the first friend she has had of her own age -- she is caught in a web of lies and learns the importance of honesty in friendship. I enjoyed this book and read it quickly; Millicent is a likable character but her obtuseness and high-falutin'' vocabulary became a little annoying by the last page.

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Report This Oct 22, 2009
  • rosepetal16 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

rosepetal16 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

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Report This Oct 22, 2009
  • rosepetal16 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

This book is about Chinese American girl genius. She has skipped lots of grades and is a very organized person. She is about to enter college. Her parents try to help her have a social life, but when she revealed her brains to a college girl, she gets backstabbed and used. While getting pressured to tutor her mortal enemy,Stanford Wong, and her new friend Emily Ebers, she has an unforgettable summer.

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