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Cloud Atlas

A Novel
Mitchell, David (Book - 2004 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Cloud Atlas


Item Details

Recounts the connected stories of people from the past and the distant future, from a nineteenth-century notary and an investigative journalist in the 1970s to a young man who searches for meaning in a post-apocalyptic world.
Authors: Mitchell, David (David Stephen)
Title: Cloud atlas
a novel
Publisher: New York :, Random House Trade Paperbacks,, c2004
Edition: 1st U.S. ed
Characteristics: 509 p. ;,22 cm
Statement of Responsibility: David Mitchell
Summary: Recounts the connected stories of people from the past and the distant future, from a nineteenth-century notary and an investigative journalist in the 1970s to a young man who searches for meaning in a post-apocalyptic world.
ISBN: 9780375507250
0375507256
Branch Call Number: FICTION MITCHELL
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Report This Mar 02, 2014
  • hmcgivney rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I think I may have psyched myself out about this one. I was told that it was challenging, high-brow literature, and so I pre-judged that I wouldn't "get" it. I'm glad I gave it the college try, though, because I think these nested and entwined stories are very good. A few of them took some time for me to find the rhythm, but it wasn't insurmountably difficult. I enjoyed the differences in tone and writing style among the six stories. And I liked most of the main characters, especially Luisa Rey and Sonmi-451 (I would have appreciated a whole book about either of these women, and I think Sonmi-451's story was particularly chilling and profound). Ultimately, I enjoyed the unusual structure and style, and I appreciate the message that an individual's struggle against cruelty and oppression may not seem like much (and may feel practically pointless), but that many drops make an ocean.

Nov 26, 2013, I have the movie on hold, but by the looks of the comments, I think I might give the book a try first. I'm in the middle of Steven Kings' Dark Tower series, (its been 25 years or so, since I've read a Steven King book, and just to annoy myself, I started this series???!) so I'll save this baby for the summer maybe? It will be interesting to see if I have the willpower to send the movie back when I get it, as I believe I should get it before then?.....Feb 6, 2014, well I'm about an hour into this movie, I picked it up today at the library, and I had forgotten that I wanted to read the book first. Now I must decide, should I turn it off, and return it?? I'm thinking I'll watch another 1/2 hour and then send it off on the truck tomorrow so that the other people on hold can have it, and get the book read first. I at least now have some faces to put on the characters!! (I'm off to get a fresh homeade brownie!) (So far, my thoughts on the movie.....fascinatingly confusing, and a delight to the senses.)....(later,) managed to make myself turn it off at 1 hour and 40 minutes, but it was a challenge. Looking forward to finishing it after I read the book......Feb 20, started the book, but it is daunting, will keep reading a little each day.....Feb 22, hmm, I think I'm starting to like this book? (Not my main read, at the moment though, just a couple pages a day.)

Report This Nov 05, 2013
  • anon_reader rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This is a most strange & wondrous book that I happened upon whilst travelling in French Polynesia. I no sooner began to get into the book when ... My Dear Sixsmith, Once again I am in Bruges attempting to complete my composition, yet my attention begins to wander at the thought of the lovely ... Well. this certainly has been a trip! Discovery of corruption and conspiracy in mid-70's California! I am just about to reveal my findings when ... Bloody Hell! What am I doing in this old folks home? And how did I get here? I didn't expect to be ... As a fabricant in the not too distant future I must admit to being intrigued with the direction this story is taking ... Yes, the narrative of "Cloud Atlas" does jump about a bit. (I would have started a new paragraph here, but the OPL site does not tolerate new paragraphs. So you will have to excuse the poor typography of this comment.) Nevertheless, the story is engaging. However, the reader expects all of the loose ends to be neatly tied up by the end of the story in a conclusion of cosmic significance and yet ... there is none. Perhaps like life itself. Any maybe that was the point of the story in the first place.

Report This Jun 06, 2013
  • nlester rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

The movie was better than the book. The last 100 pages I expected everything to be revealed and make sense. Lots of extra stuff seemed added. For that long a book, a disappointment.

Report This Apr 14, 2013
  • GeoffAbel rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Writing doesn't get any better than this. In this single book, the author has proved his facility with almost any form of prose imaginable, expounding high ideas with a humourous and self-deprecating undertone. I can’t imagine any literary-minded peeps not loving this masterpiece (I chuckled about some of the negative reviews. The writing is not pompous or pretentious - that's simply the way any normally educated writer utilizes the Queen's. Also this is not a gimmicky mystery that concludes with a spectacular American climax - it's a rumination). I recommend reading Mitchell's "Ghostwritten" first to get an intro into his style.

Report This Apr 03, 2013
  • lnarizny rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A stunningly subtle and intricately connected story about the power and importance of social activism and tolerance. The construction of multiple parallels with countless themes reverberating out from the center and in from both ends, not to mention the effortless switching between genres and voices, is simply amazing. I found Cloud Atlas a little hard to get into at first, but after reaching the midway point, found myself unable to put it down. This can be a difficult book and it's not for everybody, but I enjoyed it and was completely blown away by the author's skill in constructing it.

Report This Mar 04, 2013
  • bjessima rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

My favorite book of the last many years. I found the individual stories fascinating and intricate, while the interweaving of these even more so. Thought the movie was quite good but nothing beats the book.

Report This Feb 10, 2013
  • mrmervis rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Saw the movie first, which made me want to read the book. So I'm not sure how much my impression is colored by the movie. I thought Mitchell did a very good job writting in different styles for each storyline. I appreciate how the book goes forward through time, then backward, unlike the confusing jumpy moves that the film made. The end still seems a little flat and preachy.

Report This Jan 07, 2013
  • AnneDromeda rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

David Mitchell’s *Cloud Atlas,* released in 2004, fits the definition of a sleeper hit. Ridiculously well reviewed, its unconventional composition threw many early readers. It took time for word of mouth to spread from those tenacious readers who made it far enough into the book to make sense of Mitchell’s ambitious project. Eventually, even Hollywood caught on, so those of you who’re interested in the premise but frustrated by the execution can go take it all in on the silver screen right now. You could. But I really think you should read the book first, and not just because I’m a librarian.<br /> *Cloud Atlas* is composed of six separate stories fit together like matroishka dolls. It begins with the epistolary narrative of a man at sea in the South Pacific in the 1860s, witnessing the last gasps of the slave trade and the messy, colonial birth of global capitalism and industrialism. The flowery writing perfectly suits a 19th-century adventure tale full of pirates, sailing, exploring and riches. However, just as the action begins to really pick up, the narrative ends mid-sentence.<br /> Another – seemingly unrelated – narrative begins. It follows the couch-surfing adventures of a brilliant composer named Robert Frobisher through 1930s Europe. Full of witty, Wildean dialogue, this narrative is more than entertaining enough to carry the reader through to Frobisher’s discovery of a book sharing the title of *Cloud Atlas*’s interrupted opening narrative in the South Pacific. <br /> Having just gotten readers comfortable, Mitchell again shifts focus; this time, we land in a 1970s-era spy thriller that references Frobisher. Why? No explanation’s given, and the narrative breaks again. Now we follow the head of a vanity publishing house through a comedy of errors leaving him imprisoned in a nursing home in our current time. Then we jump to the testimony of a human clone genetically optimized for food service, testifying her experience living in a hyper-commercialized dystopian version of future-Korea to a corporate archivist. Then we land in post-apocalyptic Hawai’i, where an elder tells his life story in orature. This narrative is the deepest in the layered intertextuality of *Cloud Atlas* – after hearing Zachary Bailey’s life story we move in reverse order back through the other half of the nesting narratives begun earlier in the novel.<br/ > Technically composed of six well-crafted novellas interlaced in unexpected ways, the weighty consequence of each narrative relies on all the others to be fully realized. *Cloud Atlas* could alternatively have been titled Frankfurt School’s Instrumental Reason: The Novel, but those with no background in Continental philosophy will still find much to love here, if they take the time. *Cloud Atlas* is highly recommended to fans of Margaret Atwood, Ursula K Le Guin or any literary science fiction. It is also recommended to any readers of literary fiction who don’t mind some serious experimentation, and who love beautifully crafted language.

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Report This Aug 04, 2013
  • sbn_kc rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

A convoluted mess that wanders along several threads. Found the one interesting thread and finished it across several chapters, then gave up on the book.

Report This Jul 12, 2013
  • Luv2cNewThings rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

The reader follows a group of different people through reincarnations - starting with Adam Ewing. It seems that regardless if a character lived a full life or not, his or her story goes on. The reader also goes on a passage of time. He/she will reach the pinnacle of humanity, which falls and starts all over again for a lack of better terminology! On a side note: It was interesting how David Mitchell structured the novel. Unfortunately, it simply did not keep my interest.

Report This Jan 07, 2013
  • AnneDromeda rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

David Mitchell’s *Cloud Atlas,* released in 2004, fits the definition of a sleeper hit. Ridiculously well reviewed, its unconventional composition threw many early readers. It took time for word of mouth to spread from those tenacious readers who made it far enough into the book to make sense of Mitchell’s ambitious project. Eventually, even Hollywood caught on, so those of you who’re interested in the premise but frustrated by the execution can go take it all in on the silver screen right now. You could. But I really think you should read the book first, and not just because I’m a librarian.<br /> *Cloud Atlas* is composed of six separate stories fit together like matroishka dolls. It begins with the epistolary narrative of a man at sea in the South Pacific in the 1860s, witnessing the last gasps of the slave trade and the messy, colonial birth of global capitalism and industrialism. The flowery writing perfectly suits a 19th-century adventure tale full of pirates, sailing, exploring and riches. However, just as the action begins to really pick up, the narrative ends mid-sentence.<br /> Another – seemingly unrelated – narrative begins. It follows the couch-surfing adventures of a brilliant composer named Robert Frobisher through 1930s Europe. Full of witty, Wildean dialogue, this narrative is more than entertaining enough to carry the reader through to Frobisher’s discovery of a book sharing the title of *Cloud Atlas*’s interrupted opening narrative in the South Pacific. <br /> Having just gotten readers comfortable, Mitchell again shifts focus; this time, we land in a 1970s-era spy thriller that references Frobisher. Why? No explanation’s given, and the narrative breaks again. Now we follow the head of a vanity publishing house through a comedy of errors leaving him imprisoned in a nursing home in our current time. Then we jump to the testimony of a human clone genetically optimized for food service, testifying her experience living in a hyper-commercialized dystopian version of future-Korea to a corporate archivist. Then we land in post-apocalyptic Hawai’i, where an elder tells his life story in orature. This narrative is the deepest in the layered intertextuality of *Cloud Atlas* – after hearing Zachary Bailey’s life story we move in reverse order back through the other half of the nesting narratives begun earlier in the novel.<br/ > Technically composed of six well-crafted novellas interlaced in unexpected ways, the weighty consequence of each narrative relies on all the others to be fully realized. *Cloud Atlas* could alternatively have been titled Frankfurt School’s Instrumental Reason: The Novel, but those with no background in Continental philosophy will still find much to love here, if they take the time. *Cloud Atlas* is highly recommended to fans of Margaret Atwood, Ursula K Le Guin or any literary science fiction. It is also recommended to any readers of literary fiction who don’t mind some serious experimentation, and who love beautifully crafted language.

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Cloud Atlas movie extended trailer #1

Movie due out October 2012. Cloud Atlas Extended Trailer #1 (2012) - Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Wachowski Movie HD

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