One Hundred Years of Solitude

Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
One Hundred Years of Solitude
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The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.

Publisher: New York : HarperCollins, 2003
Edition: 1st HarperCollins ed
ISBN: 0060531045
9780060531041
Branch Call Number: FICTION GARCIA
Characteristics: 417 p. ;,24 cm
Additional Contributors: Rabassa, Gregory

Opinion

From Library Staff

(1967) Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude is one of the main novels forming the magic realism style in Latin American writing. It tells the multi-generational story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch, José Arcadio Buendía, founds the town of Macondo, in the metaphoric Colombia.

The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias. If Sometimes A Great Notion is essential reading for all Oregon residents, this book is essential reading for all residents of planet Earth.

The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.

The evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town is mirrored in the family history of the Buendias.

One Hundred Years of Solitude tells the story of the rise and fall, birth and death of the mythical town of Macondo through the history of the Buendía family.


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Mar 26, 2015
  • wilqser rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Sweeping novel by a writer who was on my list when I heard of his passing. Tremendous prose and depictions. Magical.

May 29, 2014
  • lukasevansherman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

"It's obvious that no one has been in that room for at least a hundred years," the officer said to the soldiers. "There must even be snakes in there."
Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who recently passed away at the age of 87, was a giant of 20th century literature and "One Hundred Years of Solitude" is his indisputable masterpiece, although I'm also very fond of "Love in the Time of Cholera." As Salman Rushdie pointed out in a recent tribute to Marquez in the NYT Book Review, "magical realism," of which this an exemplary example, is oft misunderstood, with many people just focusing on the magical aspects. But re-reading this again, I was struck by how grounded the fantastic elements were in the lives of the characters, something many of his imitators miss. An essential novel from an essential writer. "The first piece of literature since the Book of Genesis that should be required reading for the entire human race."-William Kennedy

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