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A Feast for Crows

Martin, George R. R. (Book - 2005 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Feast for Crows
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"It seems too good to be true. After centuries of bitter strife and fatal treachery, the seven powers dividing the land have decimated one another into an uneasy truce. Or so it appears... With the death of the monstrous King Joffrey, Cersei is ruling as regent in King's Landing. Robb Stark's demise has broken the back of the Northern rebels, and his siblings are scattered throughout the kingdom like seeds on barren soil. Few legitimate claims to the once desperately sought Iron Throne still exist--or they are held in hands too weak or too distant to wield them effectively. The war, which raged out of control for so long, has burned itself out. But as in the aftermath of any climactic struggle, it is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising face--some familiar, others only just appearing--are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead. It is a time when the wise and the ambitious, the deceitful and the strong will acquire the skills, the power, and the magic to survive the stark and terrible times that lie before them. It is a time for nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages to come together and stake their fortunes... and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests--but only a few are the survivors"--Provided by publisher.
Authors: Martin, George R. R.
Title: A feast for crows
Publisher: New York : Bantam Books, 2005
Characteristics: 753 p. :,maps ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: George R.R. Martin
Summary: "It seems too good to be true. After centuries of bitter strife and fatal treachery, the seven powers dividing the land have decimated one another into an uneasy truce. Or so it appears... With the death of the monstrous King Joffrey, Cersei is ruling as regent in King's Landing. Robb Stark's demise has broken the back of the Northern rebels, and his siblings are scattered throughout the kingdom like seeds on barren soil. Few legitimate claims to the once desperately sought Iron Throne still exist--or they are held in hands too weak or too distant to wield them effectively. The war, which raged out of control for so long, has burned itself out. But as in the aftermath of any climactic struggle, it is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising face--some familiar, others only just appearing--are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead. It is a time when the wise and the ambitious, the deceitful and the strong will acquire the skills, the power, and the magic to survive the stark and terrible times that lie before them. It is a time for nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages to come together and stake their fortunes... and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests--but only a few are the survivors"--Provided by publisher.
ISBN: 0553801503
9780553801507
Branch Call Number: FICTION MARTIN
Subject Headings: Seven Kingdoms (Imaginary place) Fiction Courts and courtiers Fiction Alliances Fiction Imaginary wars and battles Fiction
Genre/Form: Fantasy fiction
Epic fiction
Topical Term: Seven Kingdoms (Imaginary place)
Courts and courtiers
Alliances
Imaginary wars and battles
LCCN: 2005053034
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Aug 24, 2014
  • jwilson01 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

*May contain Spoilers*

This book was pretty good. There were some parts that seemed to drag on a bit. I think if Martin changed some of his POV characters it would have been alot more interesting. For example, instead of Victorian Greyjoy being a POVC, the Crows Eye should have been one. I would have loved to hate him, but like him at the same time. You couldn't really sympathize with Victorian because he's a boring guy and because the only reason he hated the Crow's eye is because he slept with his "salt wife" aka his kidnapped concubine. Really? She wasn't even your real wife. I was indifferent towards the Crow's eye, but he could have had alot of potential.

Another POV character should have been Aemon Targaryen. Yeah Samwell is a good guy and should have his place in GOT, but Aemon could have given us more info about the predictions and his thoughts about the three headed dragon. It would have been cool to see how he truly felt about him serving the black. Maybe he really didn't like the life he lived, Samwell did say that he was waiting at the wall for something to happen. I would have like to learn that he was not the sweet, loyal old man that he portrayed. One good thing about this book was all the conspiracies coming to light. Like the Hound finding peace at the monastery. I personally love the Hound's character and hope that he can live the rest of his days happily. Maybe one day he'll find someone he loves! lol. I also like how Cersei's fortune is unfolding because she's bringing it upon herself! I totally hated her by the end of this book. Oh, and who is Pate, the pig boy?!?

Jul 03, 2014
  • angeye87 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Not my favorite in the series, but still pretty good. I always love watching the characters grow. I'm ready to see what happened to the rest of the characters in book 5!

Jun 29, 2014
  • bklvrt rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Don't like having to wait for the next book to read about all the other characters, going over the same time frame?
I had seen (and heard from friends) a lot of negative commentary on the problem of the timeline being gone over twice in A Feast for Crows and A Dance with Dragons. Fortunately, I also saw several references to the work of one reader to put together a chapter list that merges the two books into one chronological timeline.
Search for "boiled leather game of thrones reader-friendly" on-line to find the list if you're interested in the dual read. It does make for long breaks between character chapters, but I have found it valuable.
That said--these two books, split or together, don't have quite the intense plot march as the third book, where Martin really shone in his ability to Up the Stakes with every single chapter. (That's something that I, as a writer, find I'm learning from reading this series.) A number of characters are sitting becalmed in the metaphorical (or physical ocean) for some time during this timeline. But they continue to grow and learn things about themselves, for the most part. The books are still well-written and draw you on.

Jun 28, 2014
  • Oceanic815 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

The weakest book of the first 5 in the series, especially in comparison to its excellent predecessor, A Storm of Swords. It is a bit more difficult to get through due to the introduction of and sole focus on many new characters, leaving the reader in the dark on the main characters (Tyrion, Dany, Jon Snow, etc.) the books have followed thus far.

On average, the chapters are also longer in page length, and drag on when combined with the fact that some of these new POV characters are less interesting.

Many of the chapters have a lot of descriptive fluff, and very few events of major excitement occur in the book. Somewhere in the middle of the book there is a long stretch in which almost nothing of interest happens.

The above being said, there are enjoyable bits and pieces. Cersei's storyline was the standout for me, and the tensions growing between her and Jaime were interesting, as were Arya's few chapters. As for new characters, we meet several more members of the Great Houses Greyjoy and Martell, the latter of which I found more compelling to read about in this volume.

Overall, this is the weakest novel so far in a strong series. I'd compare it to one's least favorite child: it may not live up to your expectations but you'll love it all the same!

Jun 14, 2014
  • jeanie123 rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Argh! Are there no blue pencils in the entire Seven Kingdoms? It's not just that there are several new characters, but pages and pages about what they wear, what emblem is on their shield, what their motto is, etc. I am finding it absolutely impossible to remember who all these people are and why they are the least bit important to the story. By the time it is (hopefully) all explained to me, I will have no recollection of the details. And why are there so many same and similar names? I was frustrated by this one.

DO NOT READ THIS SERIES!

Yes, it is entertaining. It is well written. It will hook you.

But George R.R. Martin completely sold out fans for the hollywood cash. He is exactly what he claims to oppose as he pretends to be a 99%. He is not common folk, but a brilliant elitist writer who cashed in.

Being said...watch the shows. Very close to the books, and Tyrion is simply amazing to watch.

Jun 04, 2014
  • babyunicorn26 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Skip over the parts that you personally find gross and stupid and enjoy the rest. Just hope there will be a satisfying resolution to this series before we are all too old to read it.

May 27, 2014
  • kwakiutl rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A thoroughly enjoyable read, if you are not expecting a quick resolution that is. All books have been consistently great. He is a wonderful writer.

Apr 20, 2014
  • LT rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

While Martin writes an engrossing story, I'm not always sure it's worth slogging through all the gore and misogyny. In addition, his histories are so wide-ranging that it's often impossible to remember who did what to whom without a cheat sheet. My personal view is that never is too soon to read another word about Cersei. Even villainy gets dull if it is never varied. These quibbles aside, I will be tearing into A Dance With Dragons as soon as I can get it from the library.

Jan 02, 2014
  • StarLord21 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I'll admit that this book didn't entice me the way the last 3 did but there were some pretty great parts. I found all the characters in the story had slow parts which in turn made me read it slower. I did enjoy reading about the different side characters like Alleras, Tom O'Sevenstreams, etc from one character's perspective. Then reading about them later in another. I can't promise that this will be as exciting as the last but the endings will make you glad for sticking around. P.S. all fantasy books are overly descriptive, it's in the nature of the genre.

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Jun 05, 2014
  • babyunicorn26 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

babyunicorn26 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Octillion thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

Jan 28, 2013
  • michael_laing rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

michael_laing thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

DrMarkP thinks this title is suitable for 21 years and over

May 02, 2012
  • Kat958 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Kat958 thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

Oct 27, 2009
  • pmarples rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

pmarples thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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Jun 05, 2014
  • babyunicorn26 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This one mostly follows Cersei, Jaime, Brienne, the Ironmen, Samwell, and enough Arya to keep you interested. Building towards the next book to be released, and good to read closely if you are a fan of the Lannister's, if only for being such good baddies.

Jul 03, 2013
  • beastdog45 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

The fourth book in the series of Fire and Ice. Mostly filled with long narrative stretches. Luckily there are a few interesting tidbits that happen throughout. There is definitely a build up for what will be occurring in book 6 when both stories are joined again.

Jul 12, 2012
  • Caleb98 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

kings landing is at the brink of total desturction

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Jun 05, 2014
  • babyunicorn26 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

"Jaime... Tyrion is Tywin's son, not you. I said so once to your father's face, and he would not speak to me for half a year."

"Valar Morghulis"
-Arya Stark

Jan 28, 2013
  • michael_laing rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"Needle was Jon Snow's smile. He used to mess my hair and call me "little sister," she remembered, and suddenly there were tears in her eyes.” -Arya Stark

“Innocent or guilty, a Lannister pays his debts.”

Jun 22, 2012
  • imesi rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Words are wind.

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app10 Version sidamo (sidamo) Last updated 2014/09/15 11:31