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The Pox Party

Anderson, M. T. (Book - 2006 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
The Pox Party


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Various diaries, letters, and other manuscripts chronicle the experiences of Octavian, a young African American, from birth to age sixteen, as he is brought up as part of a science experiment in the years leading up to and during the Revolutionary War.
Authors: Anderson, M. T.
Title: The Pox party
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. :, Candlewick Press,, c2006
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: 351 p. ;,24 cm
Statement of Responsibility: taken from accounts by [Octavius Nothing's] own hand and other sundry sources ; collected by M.T. Anderson of Boston
Summary: Various diaries, letters, and other manuscripts chronicle the experiences of Octavian, a young African American, from birth to age sixteen, as he is brought up as part of a science experiment in the years leading up to and during the Revolutionary War.
ISBN: 0763624020
9780763624026
Branch Call Number: y ANDERSON
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"At the dawn of the Revolutionary War, young Octavian is raised in highly unusual circumstances at the Novanglian College of Lucidity. Though the scholars give him a first-rate education, they also monitor him closely… too closely. As he grows older, Octavian learns the horrifying truth of his situation, and that truth leads him to question his understanding of himself and the Revolution: if the Patriots can fight for their freedom, why can't he fight for his? With complex, historically accurate language, this book will appeal to readers who enjoy sophisticated, unflinching storytelling. If you like Octavian Nothing, you might also be interested in Chains by Laurie Halse Anderson." Teen Scene November 2013 newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=695748

Report This Mar 16, 2012
  • danielestes rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Sometimes I like to dive into a book without any foreknowledge of plot or context. Unfortunately, I began this book the same way and was lost and disinterested for the first 150 pages. I eventually figured out the writing is meant to emulate the speech and style of 18th century colonial America. This was a relief because I didn't understand why I was having so much trouble comprehending the language at first. The story of Octavian is gutsy in it's style and delivery though perhaps too gutsy. It's difficult to really feel Octavian's struggles because he acts so distantly un-human too often. We learn the secret of his plight almost as he learns it, which causes us both to be confused. I literally thought Octavian's caretakers at the beginning were robots and I was reading some sort of steampunk novel. The novel finds a better voice near the middle through to the end, but then the ending is vague. Perhaps this story is the setup for the next? Still, I don't have the interest or energy to find out.

Report This Feb 20, 2012
  • lisahiggs rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Octavian’s life might be astonishing, but his story is not. Anderson tells us that Octavian has an astonishing life, but he doesn’t show us. Octavian himself doesn’t even know his life is any different than other people’s, other boys’, other blacks. Even when he figures it out – when he finds out that he’s actually a slave and not the beloved prince of a household, and suddenly made to act accordingly – nothing really changes in his demeanor, he seems quite unastonished actually. There is a barrier between us and what might be good about this novel. There could be something astonishing here, but it’s hidden under other people’s letters driving the plot instead of the main character’s actions, in breakneck plot changes that don’t seem to bother the characters too much, and behind mysterious forbidden doors that, once opened, just result in a dry lecture by a man who changed his name to a number for very little reason and later changed it back just the same. When you have to call your story “astonishing” in the title, it’s very likely not to be so.

Report This Oct 20, 2011
  • tocch101 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Intriguing. Doesn't offer a concrete story line and I enjoyed the mystery, similar to life.

Report This Aug 11, 2009
  • chiennoir rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A challenging read from the brilliant M.T. Anderson.

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Report This Jul 26, 2011
  • Navy_Wren_3 rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

Navy_Wren_3 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Report This Aug 11, 2009
  • chiennoir rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

chiennoir thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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Report This Feb 20, 2012
  • lisahiggs rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

The Latin for “slave” – servus – as rendered in English literally is “the spared one”; slaves being those taken prisoner in battle, who should, therefore, by all rules of engagement, have been slain. In antiquity, slaves possessed no rights as citizens because, though spared, they were accounted dead, and as the dead, could not be admitted as living men; and so, for generations, the dead toiled and bred in Rome; the dead taught Rome’s children the secrets of philosophy; the dead built Rome’s great monuments and tombs; until the Romans themselves joined the dead, and all that remained were tombs, and monuments, and half-remembered tombs.

Report This Feb 20, 2012
  • lisahiggs rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

And then they imprisoned me in darkness; and though there was no color there, I still was black, and they still were white; and for that, they bound and gagged me.

Report This Feb 20, 2012
  • lisahiggs rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

I should not be sorry, did the Lord sweep the savages further to the west; but I doubt His divine will shall ever be expressed through Virginians.

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