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American Born Chinese

Yang, Gene Luen (Book - 2006 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
American Born Chinese
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Item Details

Alternates three interrelated stories about the problems of young Chinese Americans trying to participate in the popular culture. Presented in comic book format.
Authors: Yang, Gene Luen
Title: American born Chinese
Publisher: New York : First Second, 2006
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: 233 p. :,col. ill. ;,22 cm
Series:
Statement of Responsibility: Gene Luen Yang ; color by Lark Pien
Summary: Alternates three interrelated stories about the problems of young Chinese Americans trying to participate in the popular culture. Presented in comic book format.
Awards & Distinctions: Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature, 2007
Additional Contributors: Pien, Lark
ISBN: 9781596433731
1596433736
9781596431522
1596431520
9781596432086
159643208X
Branch Call Number: ygn YANG
Subject Headings: Chinese Americans Comic books, strips, etc Identity (Philosophical concept) Comic books, strips, etc Schools Comic books, strips, etc
Genre/Form: Graphic novels
Topical Term: Chinese Americans
Identity (Philosophical concept)
Schools
LCCN: 2005058105
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Alternates three interrelated stories about the problems of young Chinese Americans trying to participate in the popular culture. Presented in comic book format.

Alternates three interrelated stories about the problems of young Chinese Americans trying to participate in the popular culture. Presented in comic book format.


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Jul 04, 2014
  • 21221014684770 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

It's a mix of rage, happiness and love. The Electricity is cool too. In other words Nice Job Author.

Rage, shame and fear are the emotions driving the linked stories in this book, and they are powerfully brought to life. Buried deep within these tales are hard-won lessons on self-acceptance and friendship. But the advice is elusive, making the ending a bit of a head-scratcher.

Apr 11, 2014
  • KateHillier rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This graphic novel has three stories: one of a Chinese-American boy, one about the Monkey King, and another about an all American boy whose cousin - an extremely caricatured Chinese Man - comes to visit and ruins his life. The three at face value seem to having nothing to do with one another but how it all links together is fantastic.

The art and colour pops - especially with our caricatured character, which serves to make him seem that more offensive. It all almost reminds me of a Saturday morning cartoon with the lessons and importance of the message all neatly tied up.

Jan 24, 2014
  • joywolf83 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Brilliantly done.

Dec 27, 2013
  • mawls rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Three stories weaved together to tell a story of identity and what it means to be true to yourself.

Oct 29, 2013
  • SkycycleX2 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

This is a really well-written and drawn story of what it's like to be an outsider. Elements of it are fantastic yet I really had the sense this was what Gene Luen Yang experienced growing up Chinese-American. And he blends his emotional truthfulness with the mythological and sterotypical to elevate his book to the sublime. This is an excellent example of graphic story-telling.

Oct 17, 2013
  • dorothyrocks888 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

this book is just so amazing really good plot twists!

Aug 26, 2013
  • sanchezraul rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I like how the author Gene Luen Yang writes up three different tales that later come together in the end. Also, like the graphics on this graphic novel.

Aug 25, 2013
  • JINGNA_1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I love this book! its really funny! and that cuzin is such a funny dude!

Aug 25, 2013
  • hana_12 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This book is one very interesting and exciting book. It's telling 3 stories of 3 characters in the book and at the end, it just combined the three stories into one. I was shocked and yet amazed. I highly recommend this book!

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Jul 03, 2014
  • indigo_moose_8 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

indigo_moose_8 thinks this title is suitable for 7 years and over

Jul 13, 2013
  • udipto2000 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

udipto2000 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

Mar 25, 2012
  • Dr_Inferno rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Dr_Inferno thinks this title is suitable for 8 years and over

Nov 26, 2011
  • ja9fernando rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

ja9fernando thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 10 and 13

goldengazelle thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Dec 21, 2008
  • DavidB rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

DavidB thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Summary

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Aug 26, 2013
  • sanchezraul rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

This book sums up three different tales together then combines them in one. All of these different tales have problems with either their friends, their race and their faith. With the Monkey King and the rest. Some change characters and speak of legends that tell there faith and they finally find their reall person and become one.

Aug 25, 2013
  • hana_12 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is a very touching, and funny comic book. It was actually three stories that were being told. One story was about a Chinese boy who moved to a new home which meant that he had to start a new school and make new friends. But that wasn't so easy fro Jin. Since there were barely any Chinese kids at his new school, people made fun of Jin and not a lot of kids wanted to be his friend. Until two months later when an exchanged student from China came to his class. Jin and Wei-Cheng Sun became best friends. But Jin had to make a choice and that was to either change himself for an american girl that he liked or stay the way he is in order to keep being friends with Wei-Cheng Sun. Another story that was being told was about a boy named Danny. He was a very popular kid. But he had a problem. He is related to a Chinese boy named Chin-Kee who happened to be his cousin.Chin-Kee would always come every year to visit for 2 weeks. During those 2 weeks, he would have to go to school with Danny. Danny would be so embarrassed. Another story was of a Monkey Kinf who has lived thousands of years and mastered the arts of kung fu and the heavenly disciplines. But when he attends the party of the immortal god in heaven they told him that there was no space for him. Poor Monkey King.

Jul 17, 2012
  • buklover rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I really enjoyed this book. It was about a boy, Lin struggling to come to terms with his Chinese heritage while growing up as an American teenager. He endures several stereotypes along the way and often feels tossed between the two worlds, ultimately realizing that he needs not reject either of the two.

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Aug 26, 2013
  • hana_12 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"It's easy to become anything you wish...so long as you're willing to forfeit your soul"

Jul 17, 2012
  • buklover rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

"You know, Jin, I would have saved myself from five hundred years' imprisonment beneath a mountain of rock had I only realized how good it is to be a monkey."

Dec 21, 2008
  • DavidB rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

“So little friend, what do you want to become when you grow up?"-- "...Well.. I. I want to be a TRANSFORMER! A Robot in Disguise like this one. He changes into a truck, see? More than meets the eye! But Ma-ma says that's silly; little boys don't grow up to be Transformers."-- "Oh, I wouldn't know about that. I'm going to let you in on a SECRET, little friend. It's easy to become anything you wish.. as long as you're willing to forfeit your soul.”

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Feb 19, 2010
  • EPLTeenLibrarian rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Book Punks Review: American Born Chinese

Book Punk Maggie reviews the gaphic novel American Born Chinese.

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