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Animal, Vegetable, Miracle

A Year of Food Life
Kingsolver, Barbara (Book - 2007 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
Animal, Vegetable, Miracle
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When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them."--From publisher description.
Authors: Kingsolver, Barbara
Title: Animal, vegetable, miracle
a year of food life
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, c2007
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: 370 p. :,ill. ;,24 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Barbara Kingsolver, with Steven L. Hopp and Camille Kingsolver ; original drawings by Richard A. Houser
Summary: When Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. "Our highest shopping goal was to get our food from so close to home, we'd know the person who grew it. Often that turned out to be ourselves as we learned to produce what we needed, starting with dirt, seeds, and enough knowledge to muddle through. Or starting with baby animals, and enough sense to refrain from naming them."--From publisher description.
Additional Contributors: Hopp, Steven L. - 1954-
Kingsolver, Camille - 1987-
ISBN: 9780060852559
0060852550
Branch Call Number: 641.3 K55a 2007
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references
Subject Headings: Farm life Appalachian Region, Southern Anecdotes Country life Appalachian Region, Southern Anecdotes Agriculture Appalachian Region, Southern Anecdotes Food habits Appalachian Region, Southern Anecdotes Kingsolver, Barbara Hopp, Steven L., 1954-
Topical Term: Farm life
Country life
Agriculture
Food habits
LCCN: 2006053516
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When Barbara Kingsolver and her family move from suburban Arizona to rural Appalachia, they take on a new challenge: to spend a year on a locally produced diet, paying close attention to the provenance of all they consume. The author’s clear, compelling voice propels this locavore memoir. And the... Read More »

Kingsolver tells of her family's move to rural Appalachia and their attempt to grow and raise their own food or know the farmer who did raise their food.

Popular author Kingsolver and her family challenged themselves to a year of eating locally and sustainably.


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Jul 18, 2014
  • twintoes rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I so thoroughly enjoyed this book and the author! Very inspired to give serious thought to how my food purchases/consumption affect the environment negatively. What a wonderful awakening to the importance of eating what is grown locally, or better yet to the inspiration to grow your own!

"You'lll relish this tasty memoir by novelist Barbara Kingsolver (The Poisonwood Bible) if you want to know more about the food you eat. The author and her family -- biologist husband Steven and daughters Camille and Lily -- move from Tucson, Arizona to a small town in Virginia's southern Appalachians where they strive to eat only locally and home-grown food (there are a few exceptions, coffee being one). Among other things, readers will learn about vegetable gardening, turkey breeding, and cooking with what is in season (recipes are included). Armchair travellers will enjoy the Appalachian setting as well as the vacations (there's even one to Italy). With wonderful descriptions, humour, fact-filled sidebars, and family lore, this lively book is informative as well as charming." Armchair Travel April 2014 newsletter http://www.libraryaware.com/996/NewsletterIssues/ViewIssue/b540cdee-6ff9-4238-b4b3-c43642bf3ab4?postId=c1aab84c-7171-4dfc-bf35-bd4d1ce3a6e1

I loved this book. It's a non-fiction, written by one of my favorite fiction authors, Barbara Kingsolver.
This book details the one year in which her family ate only animals and produce which they had either raised/grown themselves, or which they could purchase from local sources. (Local being defined as anything within a 60 mile radius of their home in Virginia. So, for example, since citrus fruits are not grown within that radius, they did without citrus for that year!.) I found the whole process they went through so interesting - deciding what they were going to grow and raise; preserving (drying, canning, freezing) the food they harvested/killed for consumption during the non-harvest months; scouting out local sources of items like beef, flour, honey, etc. I came away with a greater appreciation of the work of farmers; the effort that goes into producing / raising food; the value and great variety of seeds (e.g. all the varieties of tomatoes!), the economic value of eating local; and with a desire to patronize our local farmer's market to obtain more of our produce, etc locally. It got me thinking of how I can feed my family in greener, healthier ways.

NYPL has to work on download issues as picking a duration does not work and cannot be selected.

Loved this book! Would read it again

Jul 10, 2012
  • kitkat110706 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Great book! Enjoyed her prose along with the information. Her husband's and daughter's input are enlightening and enjoyable. Only wish that the hubby's essays would have been more systematically placed. They kept popping up in the most inopportune places, causing a startling break in Kingsolver's storytelling flow. I recommend book-marking his parts, and revisiting them after finishing the overall story. They are connected to their chapters only as factual, current issues that one would do better to ponder after the chapter or story has concluded. With that said, it's a wonderful book that gives the reader some insight into the lives of the Kingsolver family, and more information about the Appalachian country. A good chaser for 'Prodigal Summer'!

Jun 11, 2012
  • kthrnmnd rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Inspiring! Barbara Kingsolver makes me want to buy a farm...or at least take better care of the plants growing on my balcony.

Like another reviewer says below. This book will change the way you think about food and how you feed your family.

Recommended by Liz Visentin

May 19, 2011
  • ksoles rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Barbara Kingsolver's Animal, Vegetable, Miracle combines a gripping and often humourous account of her family's year of living on their Virginia farm and eating only local food with serious reflections on conventional eating habits, the endangered status of small farms and the provenance of most North American produce.

Month by month, Kingsolver shares her knowledge of which crops to plant when, how to tend to growing vegetable plots and how to manage both abundance and dearth. Her daughter, Camille, contributes thoughtful essays from a teenaged point of view and adds simple recipes that celebrate seasonal produce. Kingsolver's husband, Steven Hopp, brings a series of scholarly snippets to the book, which discuss such heated issues as GMOs, pesticide use and farm labour.

The book is warm and witty but also thought provoking as it encourages readers to ask fundamental questions about our approach to food: Where does our food come from? How far has it traveled to reach us? How much energy has it used? Kingsolver makes us aware that, every time we eat, we make choices that effect global economics, the environment and our health.

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Jul 18, 2014
  • twintoes rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“The average food item on a U.S. grocery shelf has traveled farther than most families go on their annual vacations.”

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