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Look Me in the Eye

My Life With Asperger's
Robison, John Elder (Book - 2007 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Look Me in the Eye


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John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits had earned him the label "social deviant." No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings drunk. No wonder he gravitated to machines, which could be counted on. His savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself--and the world.--From publisher description.
Authors: Robison, John Elder
Title: Look me in the eye
my life with Asperger's
Publisher: New York :, Crown Publishers,, c2007
Edition: 1st ed
Characteristics: xiv, 288 p. ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: John Elder Robison
Contents: A little misfit
A permanent playmate
Empathy
A trickster is born
I find a Porsche
The nightmare years
Assembly required
The dogs begin to fear me
I drop out of high school
Collecting the trash
The flaming washtub
I'm in prison with the band
The big time
The first smoking guitar
The ferry to Detroit
One with the machine
Rock and roll all night
A real job
A visit from management
Logic vs. small talk
Being young executives
Becoming normal
I get a bear cub
A diagnosis at forty
Montagoonians
Units one through three
Married life
Winning at basketball
My life as a train
Summary: John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits had earned him the label "social deviant." No guidance came from his mother, who conversed with light fixtures, or his father, who spent evenings drunk. No wonder he gravitated to machines, which could be counted on. His savant-like ability to visualize electronic circuits landed him a gig with KISS, for whom he created their legendary fire-breathing guitars. Later, he drifted into a "real" job, as an engineer for a major toy company. But the higher Robison rose, the more he had to pretend to be "normal" and do what he simply couldn't: communicate. It was not until he was forty that an insightful therapist told him he had the form of autism called Asperger's syndrome. That understanding transformed the way Robison saw himself--and the world.--From publisher description.
ISBN: 9780307395986
0307395987
Branch Call Number: 616.85883 R666L 2007
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Report This Feb 13, 2013
  • howgwyn rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I enjoyed the first part of the book where Robison describes growing up with autism from his point of view and reflects on how that view point is different from people not on the austism spectrum. Yet I felt the latter part of the book felt rushed and repetative.

Report This Aug 09, 2012
  • kayjuni rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

My sister recommended I read Look Me in the Eye. She also grew up as an undiagnosed Aspergian, like the author. He gives insight into how hard it was growing up misunderstood and how he struggled with why he couldn't be "normal". He talks a little at the end about what a relief it was when he was finally diagnosed, he finally had an explanation for why he was different, which is very similar to what my sister felt when she was diagnosed. He also talks very candidly about growing up the son of abusive alcoholics and how his mother's struggle with her own mental illness affected him. My only criticism is I kind of lost interest for a little while in the middle because he talked a lot about going on tour with KISS and working for a toy company and different pranks he pulled. They were good stories, but I felt like his writing in these parts lost a little of the personal tone that made the rest of the book so powerful. I think everyone, not just people who have or know someone who has Asperger's, should read this book to gain an understanding of people who act a little different.

Report This Jul 16, 2012
  • results rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book truly helped me understand and sympathize with what's it's like to be Aspergian.

Report This May 16, 2012
  • Donnalee Smith rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I'd read this book because I have a family member with Asperger's, but this is a fascinating story in its own right. This book is often funny, sometimes sad, but it is an always fascinating book for looking at the world from someone else's perspective. The connection to the Running With Scissors family may be an added bonus for some people, and the connection to classic rock bands like Kiss and PInk Floyd may be an added bonus for some other readers.

Report This Feb 10, 2012
  • dotdeangelo rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Since I love his brother's work I was already half sold before I started the read. Turned out to like it much.

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Report This Jun 13, 2012
  • kayjuni rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

"Asperger's is not a disease. It's a way of being. There is no cure, nor is there a need for one."

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