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Aesop's Fables

(Book - 2008 )
Aesop's Fables
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'The story goes that a sow who had delivered a whole litter of piglets loudly accosted a lioness. "How many children do you breed?" asked the sow. "I breed only one", said the lioness, "but it is very well bred!"' The fables of Aesop have become one of the most enduring traditions of European culture, ever since they were first written down nearly two millennia ago. Aesop was reputedly a tongue-tied slave who miraculously received the power of speech; from his legendary storytelling came the collections of prose and verse fables scattered throughout Greek and Roman literature. First published in English by Caxton in 1484, the fables and their morals continue to charm modern readers: who does not know the story of the tortoise and the hare, or the boy who cried wolf? This new translation is the first to represent all the main fable collections in ancient Latin and Greek, arranged according to the fables' contents and themes. It includes 600 fables, many of which come from sources never before translated into English.
Uniform Title: Aesop's fables. English
Title: Aesop's fables
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008
Characteristics: 306 p. ;,20 cm
Statement of Responsibility: translated with an introduction and notes by Laura Gibbs
Additional Contributors: Gibbs, Laura
Aesop
ISBN: 0199540756
9780199540754
Branch Call Number: 888 A254g 2008
Other Language: Translated from the Ancient Greek and Latin
Subject Headings: Aesop's fables Translations into English Fables, Greek Translations into English
Topical Term: Fables, Greek
LCCN: 2008273814
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“Aesop was probably a prisoner of war, sold into slavery in the early sixth century BC, who represented his masters in court and negotiations and relied on animal stories to put across his key points. Such fables vividly reveal the strange superstitions of ordinary ancient Greeks, how they treat... Read More »

Comment by: Multcolib_Research May 23, 2013

“Aesop was probably a prisoner of war, sold into slavery in the early sixth century BC, who represented his masters in court and negotiations and relied on animal stories to put across his key points. Such fables vividly reveal the strange superstitions of ordinary ancient Greeks, how they treate... Read More »


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“Aesop was probably a prisoner of war, sold into slavery in the early sixth century BC, who represented his masters in court and negotiations and relied on animal stories to put across his key points. Such fables vividly reveal the strange superstitions of ordinary ancient Greeks, how they treated their pets, how they spoilt their sons and even what they kept in their larders.” (Aesop, 620–560 B.C.)

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/29 09:56