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Nineteen Eighty-four

Orwell, George (Book - 1992 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Nineteen Eighty-four
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While the totalitarianism that provoked George Orwell into writing 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' seems to be passing into oblivion, his harrowing, cautionary tale of a man trapped in a political nightmare has had the opposite fate, and its relevance and power to disturb our complacency seem to grow decade by decade.
Authors: Orwell, George, 1903-1950
Title: Nineteen eighty-four
Publisher: New York : Knopf, 1992
Characteristics: xlii, 325 p. ;,21 cm
Series:
Statement of Responsibility: George Orwell ; with an introduction by Julian Symonds
Summary: While the totalitarianism that provoked George Orwell into writing 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' seems to be passing into oblivion, his harrowing, cautionary tale of a man trapped in a political nightmare has had the opposite fate, and its relevance and power to disturb our complacency seem to grow decade by decade.
Alternate Title: 1984
ISBN: 0679417397
9780679417392
Branch Call Number: FICTION ORWELL 1992
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. xxv-xxvii)
Subject Headings: Totalitarianism Fiction London (England) Fiction
Genre/Form: Political fiction
Dystopias
Topical Term: Totalitarianism
LCCN: 92052906
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While the totalitarianism that provoked George Orwell into writing 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' seems to be passing into oblivion, his harrowing, cautionary tale of a man trapped in a political nightmare has had the opposite fate, and its relevance and power to disturb our complacency seem to grow deca... Read More »

George Orwell's classic, cautionary tale of a man trapped in a political nightmare.

While the totalitarianism that provoked George Orwell into writing 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' seems to be passing into oblivion, his harrowing, cautionary tale of a man trapped in a political nightmare has had the opposite fate, and its relevance and power to disturb our complacency seem to grow deca... Read More »


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Jul 19, 2014
  • mrashid09 rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

It was a good book

Jul 09, 2014
  • Bayside rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I felt that this book was way ahead for its time. It has a great plot, strong characters, and the themes are relevant even in the 21st century

Jul 09, 2014
  • GirlofNYC rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Orwell was way ahead of his time. This book is a masterpiece. It's my favorite book because not only is it written well, but it is also very clever and realistic.

Mar 02, 2014
  • i_am rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Nineteen Eighty-Four is an eerily prophetic novel by George Orwell which shows a bleak world from which there is no escape for people from tyranny of a few as they seek to control the masses through a steady dose of patriotic wars, constant misinformation and by changing the history itself. In this world, not only saying things as they are is unimaginable but even thinking them through is a crime as the citizenry needs to be dumbed down into a servile and mindless horde. Knowledge is power and it must be destroyed so that the perceived reality can be more easily shaped by oppressors who will settle for nothing less than blind devotion from people to perpetuate their own rule. This is literature in its finest hour.

Best novel ever written. Period.

Fair warning: Pretty good book, but pages 192-208 and 210-226 was just plain rubbish. It talked about what their leader Emanueal Goldstein said in "the book". It was just pages and pages of what Goldstein thinks about, nothing important, nothing exciting, no action; eight pages worth of history and thoughts. I could not finish it all and skipped right to the action, which is right after the boring part!

Dec 18, 2013
  • ADWithrow rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Obviously this book is really good. It is a classic for a reason. I read the entire book in a single sitting and never got bored. The characters were well developed and sympathetic. I was really hoping this book lived up to the hype, and it did.

Many times throughout reading I would find myself imagining or comparing the story to the modern world. North Korea popped up a few times as did some aspects of the US and other countries.

I liked that the book didn't have the typical happy ending. So many of these books end with some unrealistic plot device where one person (or just a few people) change everything in a dystopian world. I liked that this book was more realistic about how difficult changing an environment like this would really be, and was so honest about what life would be like. It is very easy to imagine this world becoming reality and that makes the book even more frightening.

Oct 24, 2013
  • ppink rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Very well written and highly recommended book. The story is bleak and depressing but brilliant at the same time. It has parallels to the world today.

Sep 14, 2013
  • Seankoppenhafer rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I usually don't like books set in the real world, but I really did enjoy this book. The story develops very quickly and you know from the first chapter that things are very bleak for Winston Smith. A great read that is still relevant in our society today.

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Jul 11, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

platypus101 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

Jun 18, 2013
  • pratima1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

pratima1 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

May 02, 2013
  • neutravlad rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

neutravlad thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

Jul 24, 2012
  • richardhe rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

richardhe thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Jul 17, 2012
  • JennComishen rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

JennComishen thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

quinny_weeze thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

May 07, 2012
  • Jeroman rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Jeroman thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 15 and 99

May 01, 2012
  • Navy_Hare_2 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Navy_Hare_2 thinks this title is suitable for 11 years and over

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Summary

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Jul 09, 2014
  • Bayside rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Nineteen Eighty-four is about a Utopian society set in that year. In this society the government controls everything, including the past, the present, the future, privacy and language. Citizens are controlled by fear and brainwashing, and are always under direct supervision by telescreens, allowing little to no privacy. The novel revolves around a member of the society by the name of Winston. Winston is a relatively average member who, throughout the course of the novel, begins to secretly rebel against his government.

Jul 11, 2013
  • platypus101 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Orwell had a daunting task: creating a future nearly half a century away from the time period in which he was writing. This future had to be its own complex, independent society, but it also had to be the natural end result of the totalitarianism Orwell witnessed in the communist and socialist regimes of World War II. That's part of the horror of 1984: this future is a recognizable one, even in the 21st century. It's easy to see how those in control can, through manipulation and propaganda, maintain that control simply for the sake of sating their own power hunger. It's easy to say "no one could ever tell me what to think or what to do," but the Party's use of Big Brother, the Thought Police, the Two-Minute Hate, and Doublethink make it easy to see how a person's ability to think independently and discern fiction from reality can be eroded when there is no touchstone to fact. Revising and rewriting the past to make certain that Big Brother and the Party are always correct has effectively eliminated historical accuracy. How can one think and reason in a society where everything is a fabrication?

Jul 17, 2012
  • JennComishen rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Winston, a member of the straight forward, controlled society we now live in 1984, begins to question Big Brother, along with a collegue of his. The two of them get information and try to take down Big Brother themselves, however with the help of a betrayel Big Brother catches on to their plans. Using the dark methods of Double think and the haunting room 101, both Winston and his collegue are 'barinwashed' as the rest of society is, and taken over by Big Brother

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Violence: Contains violence

Coarse Language: This title contains Coarse Language.

Sexual Content: This title contains Sexual Content.

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Jun 18, 2013
  • pratima1 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

“He who controls the past controls the future. He who controls the present controls the past.”

Dec 17, 2012
  • LazyNeko rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"...History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right. I know, of course, that the past is falsified, but it would never be possible for me to prove it, even when I did the falsification myself. After the thing is done, no evidence remains. The only evidence is inside my own mind, and I don't know with any certainty that any other human being shares my memories..."

Jul 17, 2012
  • JennComishen rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A hideous ecstasy of fear and vindictiveness, a desire to kill, to torture, to smash faces in with a sledgehammer, seemed to flow through the whole group of people like an electric current, turning one even against one's will into a grimacing, screaming lunatic." Part 1, Chapter 1, pg. 16

May 07, 2012
  • Jeroman rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Under the spreading chestnut tree
I sold you and you sold me
now here we lie and there they lie
under the spreading chestnut tree

Apr 04, 2012
  • andrew_james_shkreli rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

"Orthodoxy is unconsciousness."
-Syme

Jan 29, 2010
  • haPPY_FUn_baLL rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Who controls the past,’ ran the Party slogan, ‘controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.

Whether he went on with the diary, or whether he did not go on with it, made no difference. The Thought Police would get him just the same. He had committed— would still have committed, even if he had never set pen to paper— the essential crime that contained all others in itself. Thoughtcrime, they called it. Thoughtcrime was not a thing that could be concealed forever.

The Ministry of Truth, which concerned itself with news, entertainment, education and the fine arts. The Ministry of Peace, which concerned itself with war. The Ministry of Love, which maintained law and order. And the Ministry of Plenty, which was responsible for economic affairs

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Sep 02, 2009
  • drewsattack rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

1984

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