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Notes From Underground

Dostoyevsky, Fyodor (Book - 2004 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Notes From Underground
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Pevear and Volokhonsky's translation is the only translation that counts. They are the only translators who succeed in making Dostoevsky accessible to a 21st century audience, thanks to their ruthless attention to detail at the expense of alterations which can dilute Dostoevsky's unique and flowing style of writing. The great appeal this book retains even today is in part due to Pevear and Volokhonsky, as well as to Dostoevsky himself. Furthermore, Richard Pevear's substantial introduction is essential reading. It explains the purpose of the book and the historical significance of its ideas. Dostoevsky was writing at a time when Russia had reason to be optimistic, but the warning signs in his fiction perhaps leave us clues as to why Russia still has social problems today - and why, less than 40 years after Dostoevsky's death, Russia embraced Communism and destroyed the society in which Dostoevsky had lived
Authors: Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881
Title: Notes from underground
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2004
Characteristics: xxxi, 126 p. ;,22 cm
Series:
Statement of Responsibility: Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated from the Russian by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volohonsky ; with an introduction by Richard Pevear
Contents: Introduction
Select bibliography
Chronology
Notes from underground
pt. 1. Underground
pt. 2. Apropos of the wet snow
Notes
Additional Contributors: Volokhonsky, Larissa
Pevear, Richard - 1943-
ISBN: 9781857152715
1857152719
9781400041916
1400041910
Branch Call Number: FICTION DOSTOYEVS 2004
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. xxiii-xxiv)
Subject Headings: Russia Officials and employees Fiction Russia History 1801-1917 Fiction
LCCN: 2003059216
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"Yes — you, you alone must pay for everything because you turned up like this, because I'm a scoundrel, because I'm the nastiest, most ridiculous, pettiest, stupidest, and most envious worm of all those living on earth who're no better than me in any way, but who, the devil knows why, never ... Read More »

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Feb 18, 2014
  • EleventyOne rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A short story of a troubled 19th c. Russian bureaucrat in two parts. The first is a bit confusing as it is only a psychological prologue by the man on himself. The second part is the actual story.

This is a great introduction to Dostoevsky.

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Feb 18, 2014
  • EleventyOne rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A short story of a troubled 19th c. Russian bureaucrat in two parts. The first is a bit confusing as it is only a psychological prologue by the man on himself.

The second part is the actual story, which involves the man and his terrible relations with his old school colleagues, and with a young prostitute.

This is a great introduction to Dostoevsky I think, since it is so short and yet fully "Dostoevskian."

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