[]
[]

Notes From Underground

Dostoyevsky, Fyodor (Book - 2004 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Notes From Underground
Print

Series that include this title


Item Details

Dostoevsky's most revolutionary novel, Notes from Underground marks the dividing line between nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, and between the visions of self each century embodied. One of the most remarkable characters in literature, the unnamed narrator is a former official who has defiantly withdrawn into an underground existence. In full retreat from society, he scrawls a passionate, obsessive, self-contradictory narrative that serves as a devastating attack on social utopianism and an assertion of man's essentially irrational nature. Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky, whose Dostoevsky translations have become the standard, give us a brilliantly faithful edition of this classic novel, conveying all the tragedy and tormented comedy of the original. (Book Jacket Status: Jacketed)
Authors: Dostoyevsky, Fyodor, 1821-1881
Title: Notes from underground
Publisher: New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2004
Characteristics: xxxi, 126 p. ;,22 cm
Series:
Statement of Responsibility: Fyodor Dostoevsky ; translated from the Russian by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volohonsky ; with an introduction by Richard Pevear
Contents: Introduction
Select bibliography
Chronology
Notes from underground
pt. 1. Underground
pt. 2. Apropos of the wet snow
Notes
Additional Contributors: Pevear, Richard - 1943-
Volokhonsky, Larissa
ISBN: 1400041910
9781400041916
1857152719
9781857152715
Branch Call Number: FICTION DOSTOYEVS 2004
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references (p. xxiii-xxiv)
Subject Headings: Russia History 1801-1917 Fiction Russia Officials and employees Fiction
LCCN: 2003059216
MARC Display»

Library Staff

"Yes — you, you alone must pay for everything because you turned up like this, because I'm a scoundrel, because I'm the nastiest, most ridiculous, pettiest, stupidest, and most envious worm of all those living on earth who're no better than me in any way, but who, the devil knows why, never ... Read More »


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

Feb 18, 2014
  • EleventyOne rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A short story of a troubled 19th c. Russian bureaucrat in two parts. The first is a bit confusing as it is only a psychological prologue by the man on himself. The second part is the actual story.

This is a great introduction to Dostoevsky.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

Feb 18, 2014
  • EleventyOne rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A short story of a troubled 19th c. Russian bureaucrat in two parts. The first is a bit confusing as it is only a psychological prologue by the man on himself.

The second part is the actual story, which involves the man and his terrible relations with his old school colleagues, and with a young prostitute.

This is a great introduction to Dostoevsky I think, since it is so short and yet fully "Dostoevskian."

Notices

Add a Notice

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Videos

Add a Video

There are no videos for this title yet.

Find it at MCL

  Loading...

Powered by BiblioCommons.
Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/29 09:56