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The Innocents Abroad

Twain, Mark

(Book - 2002)
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
The Innocents Abroad
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Based on a series of letters Mark Twain wrote from Europe for San Francisco and New York newspapers as a roving correspondent, The Innocents Abroad (1969) is a caricature of the sentimental travel books popular in the mid-nineteenth century. Mark Twain's fresh and humorous perspective on hallowed European landmarks lacked reverence for the past, and was as mocking about American manners (including his own) as it was about European attitudes. Twain ultimately concludes that, for better or worse, "Human nature is very much the same all over the world."

Series that include this title

Publisher: New York : Penguin Books, 2002
ISBN: 9780142437087
0142437085
Branch Call Number: 818.4 T969in 2002
Characteristics: xliii, 514 p. :,maps ;,20 cm
Additional Contributors: Cardwell, Guy 1905-
Quirk, Tom 1946-

Opinion

From Library Staff

Join the discussion on April 16, 2015. One of the most famous travel books ever written by an American, Twain's hilarious satire impales with sharp wit both the chauvinist and the cosmopolitan. It made Twain a star.


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Dec 04, 2013
  • lukasevansherman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

If not our greatest writer, Twain may be our most quintessential and most protean. There's a Twain for everyone: Twain the tale teller ("Tom Sawyer"), Twain the social writer ("The Gilded Age"), Twain the great American novelist ("Huck Finn"), Twain the pessimist ("The Mysterious Stranger"). Before establishing himself as a novelist, Twain wrote narratives about working on the Mississippi, the Wild West and a pleasure cruise to the Holy Land, which is the subject of "The Innocent Abroad." It works as both travel literature and as satire of American tourists and sacred places (so many ruins). Compared to later Twain, the satire here is gentle and amused (Horatian) rather than harsh and dark (Juvenilian).

Dec 04, 2013
  • lukasevansherman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

If not our greatest writer, Twain may be our most quintessential and most protean. There's a Twain for everyone: Twain the tale teller ("Tom Sawyer"), Twain the social writer ("The Gilded Age"), Twain the great American novelist ("Huck Finn"), Twain the pessimist ("The Mysterious Stranger"). Before establishing himself as a novelist, Twain wrote narratives about working on the Mississippi, the Wild West and a pleasure cruise to the Holy Land, which is the subject of "The Innocent Abroad." It works as both travel literature and as satire of American tourists and sacred places (so many ruins). Compared to later Twain, the satire here is gentle and amused (Horatian) rather than harsh and dark (Juvenilian).

I checked out "The Innocents Abroad" in August and have no idea when it is due. I would like to renew.

I have not been receiving notices about my checked out material since I moved to the Mather on July 28th.

My new address is 450 Davis St., Evanston 60201, but I am using the same computer!

Please look into this for me!

Thank you! Penny Whiteside

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