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A Tale Dark & Grimm

Gidwitz, Adam

(Book - 2010)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A Tale Dark & Grimm
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Follows Hansel and Gretel as they walk out of their own story and into eight more tales, encountering such wicked creatures as witches, along with kindly strangers and other helpful folk. Based in part on the Grimms' fairy tales Faithful Johannes, Hansel and Gretel, The seven ravens, Brother and sister, The robber bridegroom, and The devil and his three golden hairs.
Publisher: New York : Dutton Children's Books, c2010
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780525423348
0525423346
Branch Call Number: j GIDWITZ 2010
Characteristics: 256 p. :,ill. ;,22 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

The author asks at the beginning of this book: "Are there any small children in the room now?" If so, it would be best if we just...hurried them off to bed. Because this is where things start to get, well...awesome." Hansel and Gretel wander out of their own tale and into some othe... Read More »

Follow Hansel and Gretel as they walk out of their own story and into eight more tales, encountering such wicked creatures as witches, along with kindly strangers and other helpful folk. This is based in part on several of the Grimms' fairy tales. gr. 4-7

Follows Hansel and Gretel as they walk out of their own story and into eight more tales, encountering such wicked creatures as witches, along with kindly strangers and other helpful folk. Do not read if you don't like scary stories.

Retells the Brothers Grimm fairy tales in a humorous, speaking-directly-to-the-reader way, with plenty of gruesome details (Hansel and Gretel get beheaded! Twice! And re-headed.)

Follows Hansel and Gretel as they walk out of their own story and into eight more tales, encountering such wicked creatures as witches, along with kindly strangers and other helpful folk. Based in part on the Grimms' fairy tales Faithful Johannes, Hansel and Gretel, The seven ravens, Brother and ... Read More »


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Age

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ZhangDelia thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 8 and 13

orange_cat_1095 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 10 and 11

Aug 17, 2014
  • orange_llama_57 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

orange_llama_57 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 13 and 8

Jul 10, 2014
  • blue_ladybug_80 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

blue_ladybug_80 thinks this title is suitable for 9 years and over

violet_butterfly_2663 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 6 and 11

red_hamster_134 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Jul 09, 2014
  • indigo_leopard_18 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

indigo_leopard_18 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 9 and 9

red_zebra_970 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Jul 09, 2014
  • blue_dog_6728 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

blue_dog_6728 thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

blue_cat_48431755 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 6 and 6

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Jan 03, 2015
  • bluethorn_from_windclan rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This book is ... 'Awesome' ... in a well, gruesome kind of way

"If you think of fairy tales as nice, pretty little stories that bore children to sleep, A Tale Dark & Grimm will make you think again. Weaving the disturbing bits of several Brothers Grimm tales and plenty of his own mischief into a single story, author Adam Gidwitz tells his own version of the adventures of Hansel and Gretel. Readers who enjoy wry humour, grisly horror, and interrupting narrators (à la Lemony Snicket) will be thrilled with this book -- and might also like the dark but less bloody stories in Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling's collection Troll's Eye View." Kids' Books October 2014 newsletter http://www.libraryaware.com/996/NewsletterIssues/ViewIssue/965fdc34-a334-470a-b762-c1b8e02d058e?postId=e10f2a09-b2a3-4420-9dbc-b7446cedba19

Jul 28, 2014
  • FindingJane rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Reminding us of the dark horror that lay at the heart of the original Grimm fairy tales, “A Tale Dark & Grimm” is a treat for the intrepid reader. It is gory and sickening and reminds us of a more terrifying world, one before political correctness or exaggerated care for children ever existed. Hansel and Gretel are forged and tempered in fires as hot as the one that bakes the baker woman and chilled in unrelenting hoarfrost. They are literally and figuratively put through hell and come out all the stronger at the other end. The book continually exhorts the reader to make sure that small children are kept out of the room (the book’s creator operates on the assumption that such stories will be read aloud) and you’re inclined to heed that advice. In spite of the relative youth of the main protagonists, this really isn’t for children. If you like your fairy tales with spice, grit and blood, this is the book for you. It’s also fun picking apart the various tales and figuring out which Grimm story formed each one.

Jan 26, 2014
  • Cynthia_N rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Loved reading this! Has enough action and drama to capture the attention of struggling readers. Would make a great read-aloud novel.

so cool but scary i could not put it down

Aug 31, 2013
  • hania4987 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

the meaning of "under-stand" ... interesting read

Aug 29, 2013
  • bwortman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Gidwitz's novel is a fun reimagining of several of Grimm's fairy tales, which he ties together with the thread of Hansel and Gretel wandering through each tale. Never shying away from the darkness of the original tales and often reveling in it, the novel also explores the tensions of family relationships and the power of children. With interjections from the narrator that often made me crack up (my favourite being: "Because the best way to kill a warlock is to cook him with poisonous snakes in a cauldron of boiling oil. Obviously."), the book will appeal both to the children it's aimed at and adults as well. Just make sure there's no little kids hiding under the bed because this book definitely isn't for them.

Jul 19, 2013
  • geniusgirl613 rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

This was a very interesting spin-off of many well-known fairy tales, artfully melded into that of Hansel and Gretel. I enjoyed this book and would have given it a better rating if not for the recurring violence. However, one thing can be said for the narrator: he does warn the reader off the impeding blood. An interesting read.

Apr 08, 2013
  • ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

How do you forgive people when they’ve done terrible things to you? Is there a point where you can let go, and is there harm in holding on to your anger? And how on earth do you take seven or more incredibly violent Grimm fairy tales and turn them into a meaningful story about finding home, finding yourself, and finding what it means to be forgiving? That Gidwitz attempted it in the first place is bizarre. That he succeeds is baffling. The good kind of baffling. With enough blood and guts to satisfy even the most craven of readers, this is the rare horror tale for kids that also happens to have a lot of literary merit as well. The combination crops up in young adult literature all the time, but not so much on the kid side of things. Such books are rarities. This book, a gem. A new idea for some very old literature.

Jan 24, 2013
  • LIZZY24590 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

awsome book!!!!! i loved it. the Authors comments in the story were a little annoying but sometimes they were funny. :)

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Summary

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Hansel and Gretel walk out of their own story and into eight other classic Grimm (and Grimm-inspired) fairy tales. An irreverent, witty narrator leads us through encounters with witches, warlocks, dragons, and the devil himself. As the siblings roam a forest brimming with menacing foes, they learn the true story behind the famous tales, as well as how to take charge of their destinies and create their own happily ever after. Because once upon a time, fairy tales were awesome.

Apr 08, 2013
  • ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

We all know some of the better known Grimm fairy tales out there like “Rapunzel” or “Cinderella”. Heck, we probably even know some of their original story elements (chopping of heels and toes, getting blinded by thorns, etc.). The Grimm tales were just that. Grim. Now imagine finding yourself living them. Prince Hansel and Princess Gretel are born in one lesser known Grimm fairy tales, “Faithful Johannes” and when they discover that their mom and dad are potentially unhinged they set off to make their way in the world and find some decent parents. In doing so they wander through a series of little known tales like “The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs” and “The Seven Ravens”. Unfortunately, while doing so they have a tendency to lose digits, lose their humanity, lose their lives (almost), and find that sometimes the fastest way to end your travels to go back to where you started.

Notices

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Dec 15, 2010
  • Violet_Wombat_2 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Violence: This title contains Violence.

Quotes

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Apr 08, 2013
  • ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

“… Once Upon a Time, no grown-up was perfect. You, my dear reader, have certainly learned that by now.”

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app06 Version musli Last updated 2015/02/24 14:10