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Into the Wild

Krakauer, Jon (Book - 1997 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Into the Wild


Item Details

In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.
Authors: Krakauer, Jon
Title: Into the wild
Publisher: New York :, Anchor Books,, 1997
Edition: 1st Anchor Books ed
Characteristics: 207 p :,maps ;,21 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Jon Krakauer
Notes: Originally published: New York : Villard, c1996
Summary: In April 1992 a young man from a well-to-do family hitchhiked to Alaska and walked alone into the wilderness north of Mt. McKinley. His name was Christopher Johnson McCandless. He had given $25,000 in savings to charity, abandoned his car and most of his possessions, burned all the cash in his wallet, and invented a new life for himself. Four months later, his decomposed body was found by a moose hunter. How McCandless came to die is the unforgettable story of Into the Wild.
ISBN: 0385486804
9780385486804
0613033574
9780613033572
Branch Call Number: 917.98 K893i 1997
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Report This Apr 11, 2014
  • Neil333 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

People who idealize their parents are in denial regarding how much deception, (physical/sexual/emotional) abuse, hypocrisy, neglect, torture, projection, insults, (false) accusations, etc. parents (and adults) actually inflict on (their) children. There's nothing wrong with loving your parents, but don't assume that people who 'hate' their parents are wrong to do so. Sometimes it's good to be honest about how you feel about your parents and be independent from them, instead of acting out your rage and emotional blindness on scapegoats [and/or (one's) children] or on your parents themselves (who were the aggressors, abusers, neglecters, and/or primary traumatizers when you were a child). The fact is Christopher McCandless was taught to undervalue his own life in his childhood home. He died in the wake of his effort to forgive his parents (for mistreating him and lying to him in his early life), yet his parents never deserved or earned that forgiveness; and the tragedy is that he died for his parents' sins. We should question our parents, our leaders, and our society, instead of following and agreeing with everything people do, especially if it's destructive, artificial, violent, abusive and/or murderous, etc.

Report This Jan 29, 2014
  • brett7749 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Great read, by far Jon Krakauer's best, enjoyed the movie thought the book was far better but you'll save a hell of a lot of time just watching it on dvd

Report This Aug 06, 2013
  • susanchyn rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Worth reading. Krakauer clearly did a lot of legwork research and the interviews are really good. One weakness is the sloppy sequencing of the storytelling; another, the uneven, often jarringly, narrative voice.

Report This Jun 24, 2013
  • moose33 rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

I saw the film first, and was blown away by Christopher McCandless' eagerness and wanderlust. I was more than impressed by the book it had been based off of. This book is, in a way, a detective novel of sorts, as Krakauer had to retrace and analyse Christopher's far-flung footsteps to bring this incredible story together. This makes it all the more exhilarating and mysterious. Christopher's character takes on a sort of legendary mystique as his quest for exploration and new experiences is detailed in this somewhat scattered but wonderfully suiting narrative.

Report This Jun 03, 2013
  • lisahiggs rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I keep breaking my promise to avoid non-fiction, but Into the Wild is quick and fairly gripping – at least when the story stays about Chris McCandless’ final journey and doesn’t wander off into the histories of the other “marginal characters who have marched off into the Alaska wilds over the years, never to reappear.” I don’t think I’ll ever understand people who hate their parents and cut them out of their lives, because mine were awesome. McCandless’ parents seem like average loving middle-upper class parents, and he had avoided them for years before he showed up dead in Alaska. Starving to death, god. What an amazing final journey, though. I wonder how he felt about misjudging his situation in the end. I wonder how he felt about how he treated his parents. I wonder if he knew his literary hero Jack London died of alcoholism at age 40 and spent only one winter in the Klondike?

Report This Apr 17, 2013
  • joliebergman rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Great, sad, wonderful story.

Report This Jan 30, 2013
  • elsaruh rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

An interesting read. Like many of us, the author relates deeply to Chris McCandless and his urge to live in the wild, which led him to write this book. He does a good job of addressing both 'sides': those who romanticize McCandless's fateful adventure and those who think he was a punk kid with a death wish and no respect for the Alaskan wild. Krakauer also briefly visits the stories of other men who have gone on similar adventures, some who survived. It is easy to say that hubris and ignorance are what led to McCandless's death, but he also may have been one of those people who's ideas were just too big for the 'normal' world. His story is both inspiring and uninspiring at the same time.

Report This Jul 09, 2012
  • SummerNightGirl rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

I would reccomend this book to anyone who wishes to follow Christopher's path to go into the wild. Why? because the story teaches what you must do to survive or in Christopher's Case, Prevent you from living into the wild...anyways, yeah! I loved the story especially since I love adventure! :D

Report This Jun 27, 2012
  • ownedbydoxies rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

Illuminating true story. The author cites incidents in his own history which mirror some of the issues faced by Christopher, and then compares their differing responses. A lot of interesting rumination on fathers and sons and their sometimes complex relationships. Highly recommended.

Report This Jun 14, 2011
  • alihpforev rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Just average, the movie depicts the story/journey of Christopher Johnson McCandless a lot better. The book kind of goes in and out between the story, facts and other events similar to Christopher McCandless.

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Report This Sep 18, 2009
  • markv rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

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Report This Jun 03, 2013
  • lisahiggs rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

If this adventure proves fatal and you don’t ever hear from me again I want you to know you’re a great man. I now walk into the wild. Alex.

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