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Robopocalypse

A Novel

Wilson, Daniel H.

(Book - 2011)
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Robopocalypse
Print
Two decades into the future humans are battling for their very survival when a powerful AI computer goes rogue, and all the machines on earth rebel against their human controllers.
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, c2011
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780385533850
0385533853
Branch Call Number: SF WILSON 2011
Characteristics: 347 p. ;,25 cm

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Worst case scenario - sentient robots have taken over, will humanity survive? Terrifying premise, fast, fun read.

Two decades into the future humans are battling for their very survival when a powerful AI computer goes rogue, and all the machines on earth rebel against their human controllers.

Two decades into the future humans are battling for their very survival when a powerful AI computer goes rogue, and all the machines on earth rebel against their human controllers.


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Good read, I know the theme is a bit worn but this is well written, the style may not suite everyone but i quite enjoyed it. This future may not be as far away as we think! Keep an eye on your smartphone & other "smart devices" from now on. 7 out of 10

Jun 16, 2014
  • Greg_library rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

A good summer read, even though the theme is the well-worn "Artificial intelligence tries to wipe out humanity, but a small group of resistance fights on". The story is told in a chronological sequence of short stories read and annotated by a resistance fighter who interprets files from a small AI who has records of various events throughout the conflict. Similar to the 'Terminator' franchise of movies without the time travel or nuclear war. I found the book a page-turner even though the end result of the conflict was revealed in the first chapter. Some scene descriptions were gruesome, with doses of profanity, but not too distracting from the story.

Recommended. It's a familiar story: in a future where robots and automation are common, an artificial super-intelligence arises and leads the machines to revolt and attack humans. Heard it, read it so many times it's a trope. But the difference is Daniel Wilson has told it really well. This novel stands out from the others. It's certainly not without flaws. It is dark, gritty and wrenching, with elements of horror. Well worth the time.

Dec 20, 2013
  • siharris rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

I loved this book. Sinister in parts and definitely not one for any robophobics out there. Ignore the comments about the structure of story, it really shouldn't detract from enjoying it. Interesting to hear it's been made into a movie, I reckon it's tailor made for a Spielberg blockbuster.

Dec 06, 2013
  • miss_moneypenny rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This one kind of falls into the guilty pleasure category, but I couldn't put it down! Daniel Wilson has written some great non-fiction books about robots and technology, and I love how he weaved all the factual stuff into a super-fun story.

When I was reading this it all felt very cinematic -- turns out it's in development with Speilberg as a film! Can't wait to see how this translates.

Sep 27, 2013
  • mvkramer rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

As far as apocalypses go, the robot apocalypse is a classic, tapping into our fundamental unease about being dependent on technologies we don't fully comprehend. And this book certainly brings the gore and the action -- robots are crushing faces left and right. The story loses some of its disaster-movie punch, however, by choosing to go the "World War Z" route and hop between a large cast of geographically diverse characters. Although I liked seeing the Osage Nation and an elderly Otaku work to end the robot revolution in completely different ways, I felt I never got to know any one of them enough to really care about them. Some of the characterization of Archos and the Freeborn robots also struck me as uneven.

I liked this book. I don't think any suspense was taken away by letting the audience know who won the war in the first page. I enjoyed every minute of this book

Jan 11, 2013
  • matt7195 rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

_Robopocalypse_ certainly has some originality to it. The writing style is probably its most interesting feature, but as one commenter pointed out, it takes away a good bit of the suspense, since we know how the story will end from page 1.

The technology in the book is also intriguing with some entertaining glimpses at where our machines and computers are headed. But a lot of the descriptions seem heavy-handed and forced. At times it feels like the reveal of the simplest device is supposed to be a revelation (like with the sensors on the walkers in the woods). At others times, I felt that some technology was never fully explained because it wasn't fully understood by the author (like the defense robots that Nomura leads).

The characters were definitely interesting, but I was never drawn to them enough to really cheer for them or mourn them when they died.

I also would have loved to learn more about the AI's personality.

The book _Steel Beach_ by John Varley does a much better job of thoughtfully considering the mindset of AI that knows its superhuman abilities.

I can't give _Robopocalypse a good review, especially knowing that it has been optioned for a movie. There are so many other science fiction stories that deserve more attention.

Aug 04, 2012
  • SilverIlix rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Couldn't stop reading it. Enjoyed the ideas and the true ingenuity that characters had. Not cookie cutter characters, people who react and adapt to the changes in their world.

Jul 25, 2012
  • stewstealth rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Solid plot, uniquely written. Due to the story structure I did not find the book suspenseful.

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Jun 16, 2014
  • Greg_library rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Greg_library thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Cellman thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Summary

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Sep 27, 2013
  • mvkramer rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

In the future, robots are everywhere, making human life safer and easier...until researchers create an AI called Archos that becomes too intelligent. Archos deems humanity a risk to the life of the planet and unleashes swarms of domestic and military robots to bring humanity down to more manageable levels. This is the story of those humans who fought back.

Aug 04, 2012
  • SilverIlix rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

The future of humankind includes robotics, and virtual intelligences in objects around you. Cars with accident avoidance programs, robots that are made to help with the heavy lifting, dolls that talk. The next step in making our lives easier. Then someone builds a program that can think, and it thinks humanity has had it's turn on the planet and it's over.

This is not a deep future setting, but a natural step in the progress of industry and a interesting view on how that works for humanity

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Jun 16, 2014
  • Greg_library rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Violence: The story contains descriptions of people being killed, injured or altered in various ways by robots or vehicles that may disturb the sqeamish.

Jun 16, 2014
  • Greg_library rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

Coarse Language: Some of the dialogue in the story contains profanity.

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app11 Version gurli Last updated 2014/12/09 10:52