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A History of the World in 100 Objects

MacGregor, Neil (Book - 2011 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
A History of the World in 100 Objects
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From the renowned director of the British Museum, a kaleidoscopic history of humanity told through things we have made. When did people first start to wear jewelry or play music? When were cows domesticated and why do we feed their milk to our children? Where were the first cities and what made them succeed? Who invented math-or came up with money? The history of humanity is a history of invention and innovation, as we have continually created new items to use, to admire, or to leave our mark on the world. In this original and thought-provoking book, Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, has selected one hundred man-made artifacts, each of which gives us an intimate glimpse of an unexpected turning point in human civilization. A History of the World in 100 Objects stretches back two million years and covers the globe. From the very first hand axe to the ubiquitous credit card, each item has a story to tell; together they relate the larger history of mankind-revealing who we are by looking at what we have made. Handsomely designed, with more than 150 color photographs throughout the text, A History of the World in 100 Objects is a gorgeous reading book and makes a great gift for anyone interested in history.
Authors: MacGregor, Neil, 1946-
Title: A history of the world in 100 objects
Publisher: New York : Viking, 2011
Edition: 1st American ed
Characteristics: xxvi, 707 p. :,col. ill., maps ;,24 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Neil MacGregor
Notes: Originally published: London ; New York : Allen Lane, 2010
Additional Contributors: British Museum
BBC Radio 4
ISBN: 9780670022700
0670022705
Branch Call Number: 930.1 M1478h 2011
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and index
Subject Headings: Antiquities, Prehistoric Classical antiquities Archaeology, Medieval Ceremonial objects Material culture
Topical Term: Antiquities, Prehistoric
Classical antiquities
Archaeology, Medieval
Ceremonial objects
Material culture
LCCN: 2011021769
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Which social-political movement at the start of the 20th century, took to defacing high circulating Edward VII pennies to draw attention to their cause?


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Jan 20, 2014
  • PaulHenryDavis rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Best world history book - ever.

Oct 22, 2012
  • Drayjayeff rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

-a wholly enjoyable book. MacGregor makes material culture come alive through brilliant story-telling.

Sep 13, 2012
  • KSerá rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Of course this is also a history of British colonialism, but MacGregor does a good job of adding culturally sensitive insights. It's great preparation for a visit to this one of many free museums in London.

Jul 28, 2012
  • anisoz rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

Well, not quite the objects I was prepared for, nor the perspective, either! Should've done my due diligence first. Still, 'twas a good, deliberate, skim. Glad to see that they chose to acknowledge more than the western world.

May 08, 2012
  • hgeng63 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

No one does history like the British! I really like how non-Western cultures were covered.

Mar 26, 2012
  • jmikesmith rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book tells the history of humanity from about 2 million years ago through to last year through a selection of 100 human-made objects, from a stone chopping tool to a solar-powered lamp. The author freely admits that the selection of objects, all from the British Museum, is subjective, but he still manages to cover a wide range of cultures, times, and places. I found that I learned things about the sophistication of African and south Asian societies that I hadn't read before. Each object gets its own chapter and at least one full-page colour photo. Some objects merit additional photos to show other angles or details. Each chapter describes the object and explains its place in history. It's a very readable and enlightening work

My only complaint is that the book is HUGE... 707 pages including index and references. It's very heavy and cumbersome to tote around if, like me, you read during your daily commute on public transit.

Oct 14, 2011
  • baylife rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I loved this book and will buy it for myself to keep on my bookshelves. It is a volume I shall return to again and again to study the colour plates of the marvellous artefacts from the British Museum and to read of the provenance and the fascinating historical context of each item. It progresses through over 5000 years of the global history of humankind and is always absorbing and easy to read. I have already placed an order to purchase my own copy. A wonderful book.

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/29 09:56