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Blood Feud

The Man Who Blew the Whistle on One of the Deadliest Prescription Drugs Ever
Sharp, Kathleen (Book - 2011 )
Average Rating: 4.5 stars out of 5.
Blood Feud
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"Blood Feud is the electrifying true tale of Big Pharma's power, regulatory weakness, and the terrifying vulnerability of millions of innocent patients. Procrit, an anti-anemia drug, this miraculous blood booster was one of the first biotech blockbusters. Developed by Amgen and licensed to a Johnson & Johnson company, the drug was sold by the two companies under the brand names Procrit, Epogen, and Arenesp. Mark Duxbury was the gung-ho salesman for the new biotech division of J&J, an irrepressible character full of jokes. In the early 1990s, he set out to spread the benefits of Procrit, and became a true believer and top seller. But he and his peers were told to steal business from J&J's partner, Amgen. Then came the marketing studies, the off-invoice rebates, doctor payments, and off-label claims. Duxbury tried to stop some of these ruthless programs, but was fired on trumped-up charges. He tried anything to warn the public: testifying in a secret arbitration, joining a class action effort, and filing a whistleblower suit. But he was thwarted at nearly every turn-until the surprising end."--From jacket.
Authors: Sharp, Kathleen
Title: Blood feud
the man who blew the whistle on one of the deadliest prescription drugs ever
Publisher: New York : Dutton, c2011
Characteristics: viii, 424 p. ;,24 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Kathleen Sharp
Contents: Meet and greet
The deal
Medicine road
Raise the stakes
The cancer indication
Chosen one
The deposition
On the border
Blues
Quality of life
Gaslighting
The overdose plan
The millionaires' club
"Strength for living"
Code mistress
The arbitrator
For the king
Black ops
The eleventh hour
Twice saved
Miracle gro
Brothers
The powers that spin
The burden
Summary: "Blood Feud is the electrifying true tale of Big Pharma's power, regulatory weakness, and the terrifying vulnerability of millions of innocent patients. Procrit, an anti-anemia drug, this miraculous blood booster was one of the first biotech blockbusters. Developed by Amgen and licensed to a Johnson & Johnson company, the drug was sold by the two companies under the brand names Procrit, Epogen, and Arenesp. Mark Duxbury was the gung-ho salesman for the new biotech division of J&J, an irrepressible character full of jokes. In the early 1990s, he set out to spread the benefits of Procrit, and became a true believer and top seller. But he and his peers were told to steal business from J&J's partner, Amgen. Then came the marketing studies, the off-invoice rebates, doctor payments, and off-label claims. Duxbury tried to stop some of these ruthless programs, but was fired on trumped-up charges. He tried anything to warn the public: testifying in a secret arbitration, joining a class action effort, and filing a whistleblower suit. But he was thwarted at nearly every turn-until the surprising end."--From jacket.
ISBN: 0525952403
9780525952404
Branch Call Number: 338.476153 S5318b 2011
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references
Subject Headings: Amgen Inc Johnson & Johnson Duxbury, Mark Whistle blowing United States Case studies Pharmaceutical industry Corrupt practices United States
Topical Term: Whistle blowing
Pharmaceutical industry
LCCN: 2011034552
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Library Staff

Medical drugs do all sorts of great things- they stop pain and cure illness, most of the time. While trying to get as much as they can from a drug they created a pharmacy company lies, cheats and steals. Where is the line between a drug that cures and a product that sells?


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Nov 23, 2011
  • Arachne rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is the career biography of a drug company's salesman-turned-whistleblower, I found it gripping, not least because the author has really studied the background of science and medicine relating to the book. I'm sure, therefore, that her descriptions of the legal and political facets of the story are equally accurate. The role rep's play in Canada in relation to MD's in private practice are different, of course, but I could visualize salespeople I've met being in this book.

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Version red_eye (red_eye) Last updated 2014/09/02 12:32