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Plastic Ocean

How A Sea Captain's Chance Discovery Launched A Determined Quest to Save the Oceans

Moore, Charles

(Book - 2011)
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Plastic Ocean
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In the summer of 1997, Charles Moore set sail from Honolulu for California after competing in a trans-Pacific race. When he and his crew took a shortcut through the seldom-traversed North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, a vast oceanic "desert" where winds are slack, Moore realized his ship was skimming through a plastic soup. He had stumbled upon the largest garbage dump on the planet, soon to be dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch--where plastic outweighs zooplankton, the ocean's food base, by six to one. Here, Moore recounts his ominous findings and unveils the secret life and hidden properties of plastics. Moore includes us in his maritime exploits as he collects samples throughout the oceans, and in his struggle to get the world's attention about the oceans' plight. He describes how plastics gradually emerged as a planetary menace--not just litter, but a potent threat to the ocean environment, and thus to life on earth.--From publisher description.
Publisher: New York : Avery, c2011
ISBN: 1583334246
9781583334249
Branch Call Number: 363.738 M8214p 2011
Characteristics: x, 358 p., [8] p. of plates :,col. ill. ;,22 cm
Additional Contributors: Phillips, Cassandra

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List - Marine Garbage by: multcolib_tamaf Feb 25, 2014

That must've been weird. Imagine taking a shortcut in your sailboat after a long race and suddenly you're sailing through a plastic soup. One of my favorite and trusted book review sources describes this as 'gonzo science at its best.' My kinda book. Color photos.


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Apr 08, 2014
  • zipread rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Plastic Ocean --- by Captain Charles Moore. For over a decade Captain Moore has been investigating what has come to be called the Garbage Gyre in mid Pacific. This is where unwanted plastics, fish nests and the other plastic cast offs of our disposable society go to die. Thing is, though, they don’t die: they enter the food chain. Alabatros feed this detritus to their chicks; zoo plankton ingest it by the ton and so do whales, seals, and other apex predators. What are the implications of all of this to ourselves and the entire planet. Moore’s book is interesting and highly informative. The book is easy to read and entertaining to boot. As they say: a good read.

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