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Eating Dirt

Deep Forests, Big Timber, and Life With the Tree-planting Tribe
Gill, Charlotte (Book - 2011 )
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
Eating Dirt


Item Details

Charlotte Gill spent twenty years working as a tree planter in Canadian forests. In this book, she examines the environmental impact of logging and celebrates the value of forests from a perspective of some one whose work caught them between environmentalists and loggers.
Authors: Gill, Charlotte, 1971-
Title: Eating dirt
deep forests, big timber, and life with the tree-planting tribe
Publisher: Vancouver :, Greystone Books,, c2011
Characteristics: 247 p. ;,23 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Charlotte Gill
Notes: Co-published by the David Suzuki Foundation
Contents: The last place on Earth
A kind of tribe
Rookie Years
Green fluorescent protein
A furious way of being
The town that logging made
At the end of the reach
Extremophiles
Sunset
Exit lines
Summary: Charlotte Gill spent twenty years working as a tree planter in Canadian forests. In this book, she examines the environmental impact of logging and celebrates the value of forests from a perspective of some one whose work caught them between environmentalists and loggers.
Additional Contributors: David Suzuki Foundation
ISBN: 9781553657927
1553657926
9781553659778
1553659775
9781553657934
Branch Call Number: 333.751530971 G4752e 2011
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Blind Date with a Book 2014 comment: 1st impression - 4; Characters - 3; Story - 5. "My husband was a tree-planter for awhile, so maybe that's why I found this book boring - I have already heard a lot of tree-planting stories. It just didn't capture my interest like my other blind date from last year."

Report This Jan 01, 2014
  • beardreamer58 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

One of the best books I have read

Report This Jun 04, 2013
  • BLeboe rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Great book. I never thought tree planting could be written about in such a poetical way. Brought back many memories.

Report This Apr 15, 2013
  • DeltaQueen50 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Eating Dirt sheds light on a corner of the logging industry that isn’t well known and manages to do this while walking a fine line between denouncing or glorifying the business. Entertaining, beautifully written and informative, this is a book I relished.

Blind Date With A Book comment: "Thank-you for helping me stumble upon a treasure I never would have encountered on my own. The writiing was as gritty as it's title."

Report This Jan 20, 2013
  • ljis rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This book is a mixture of facts and fiction. It is amazing really how in each sentence Gill has created images of our planet and BC in such a sadly, beautiful way...informative, poetic and full of the natural wonders

Report This Sep 27, 2012
  • racquetannie rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

well deserved awards. Gill is a wonderful writer and mixes the mundane and the scientific effortlessly. A must read for all who care about our forests.

Not a bad book - provides a bit of insight into the tree planting profession. A quiflk read.

Report This May 13, 2012
  • 21221015178251 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

A wonderful book. I didn't want it to end.

Report This May 02, 2012
  • Jansart rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

A look into work that most of us would cringe at, and be no means could endure. The details here make a lifestyle come alive. Only a treeplanter could write this book. Makes me so glad I do what I do. Cudos!

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The Dirtiest Job in the World

Charlotte Gill spent twenty years working as a tree planter. During her million-tree career, she encountered hundreds of clear-cuts, each one a collision site between human civilization and the natural world, a complicated landscape presenting geographic evidence of our appetites. Charged with sowing the new forest in these clear-cuts, tree planters are a tribe caught between the stumps and the virgin timber, between environmentalists and loggers. Her widely acclaimed book Eating Dirt eloquently evokes the wonder of trees, which grow from a tiny seed into one of the world's largest organisms, our slowest-growing "renewable" resource. But most of all, the book joyously celebrates the priceless value of forests and the ancient, ever-changing relationship between humans and trees.

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