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Z

A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
Fowler, Therese (Book - 2013 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Z
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A tale inspired by the marriage of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald follows their union in defiance of her father's opposition and her abandonment of the provincial finery of her upbringing in favor of a scandalous flapper identity that gains her entry into the literary party scenes of New York, Paris and the French Riviera.
Authors: Fowler, Therese
Title: Z
a novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
Publisher: New York :, St. Martin's Press,, 2013
Edition: First edition
Characteristics: 375 pages ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Therese Anne Fowler
Summary: A tale inspired by the marriage of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald follows their union in defiance of her father's opposition and her abandonment of the provincial finery of her upbringing in favor of a scandalous flapper identity that gains her entry into the literary party scenes of New York, Paris and the French Riviera.
ISBN: 9781250028655
1250028655
9781250028648
Branch Call Number: FICTION FOWLER 2013
Subject Headings: Fitzgerald, Zelda, 1900-1948 Fiction Fitzgerald, F. Scott (Francis Scott), 1896-1940 Fiction Authors' spouses Fiction Authors Fiction Nineteen twenties Fiction
Genre/Form: Biographical fiction
Topical Term: Authors' spouses
Authors
Nineteen twenties
LCCN: 2013003452
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Library Staff

Join the discussion on Oct. 14, 2014. Who is Zelda, other than the wife of a famous — sometimes infamous — husband? How can she forge her own identity while fighting her demons and Scott’s, too? With brilliant insight and imagination, Fowler brings us Zelda’s irresistible story as she herself mig... Read More »

A tale inspired by the marriage of F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald.


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Jun 16, 2014
  • Jane60201 rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I learned a lot about the Fitzgeralds as well as other writers, artists and intellectuals of that period. It was an easy read that I would recommend to anyone interested in that period of history.

Jun 11, 2014
  • KateHillier rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald are probably the most infamous literary couple of their time. This is perhaps the first time Zelda's story, fictional or otherwise, is told and for that fact along it is interesting. The pair get engaged and married relatively quickly and, even though Zelda wishes to be her own person, he desires and passions are side lined or outright taken away from her in the perhaps questionable name of her health. You want to throttle them both at points, especially as they drive each other away and yet keep coming back.

It reads a bit more like a historical overview with a bit of exploration but it is still well worth the read.

May 23, 2014
  • patcumming rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

A fine read but more like a historical recounting of Zelda and Scott's life together than a novel.

Apr 29, 2014
  • greeneer rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

While this book is rooted in a historical scope, it is still a work of fiction. I found that I increasingly couldn't stand Scott Fitzgerald and his insecurities toward his own success. I felt for Zelda and wanted to see her succeed in her passions. I enjoyed the overall book but found it a bit confusing when it came to timeline. I had a difficult time determining where I was in time. At one point, we would jump 2 years in the matter of a couple pages.

Feb 03, 2014
  • TulsaTimeTraveler rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

This book takes you into the magical world of privileged jazz-age writers and artists, thoroughly dazzles you with extravagant parties and gatherings, then snaps you back to reality with the reminder that living in excess often leads to undesirable consequences.

Sep 30, 2013
  • lozza1401 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

This book made me look at F. Scott Fitzgerald in a completely different light. Very typical - people become more famous when they are dead. It made me have greater respect for Zelda, the woman behind Fitzgerald's success. Bear in mind that this is still largely fictional.

August 2013 Fiction A to Z newsletter http://www.nextreads.com/Display2.aspx?SID=5acc8fc1-4e91-4ebe-906d-f8fc5e82a8e0&N=667162

Aug 15, 2013
  • blolo rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

If you loved the Paris Wife or Midnight in Paris, you'll love this book too. It is a fictional novel about Zelda Fitzgerald, focussing on her tumultuous marriage to F. Scott Fitzgerlad, her struggle to be known as "just the wife of a famous man" and at times her feud with Hemingway. It is also an interesting perspective. Alot of the things I've read about the Fitzgeralds have been "team scott" - they imply that Zelda was his greatest professional downfall. This book casts their relationship in a different way.

It is well-written, and still an easy read...(not mindless dribble, but not hard literature!).

sidenote: I've decided I LOVE this genre, if you can call fictionalized-accounts-of-the-lives-of-famous-women-married-to-famous-men a genre! and I'm gonna read Loving Frank this summer too.

Jul 20, 2013
  • rakusa88 rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

Fowler depicts a vivid (albeit fictional) account of the Fitzgerald’s tumultuous relationship and charts their history; vacillating between fame and ruin, from Zelda’s perspective.

The Fitzgeralds are undoubtedly a fascinating subject. Their lives appear to be every bit as reckless, extravagant and mesmerizing as the characters they penned. Fowler showcases Scott’s ambition, Zelda’s latent talents and the passion, conflict and excesses of their volatile relationship that led them on the path to success and self destruction. Although I experienced a lag in interest midway through, I appreciated that Zelda’s voice carries strongly throughout the novel such that you are invested in what happens (even though she hints repeatedly that things take a turn for the worse).

I’ve been cycling back to books of this age several times in the past year and Z really hit the spot with a good dose of the roaring twenties. This novel was an interesting companion to “the Paris Wife.” Both books portrayed the experiences of the wives of famous authors. Fitzgerald and Hemingway are fantastic writers but I’ve always struggled with their characters and the pacing of their novels. Though Z and the Paris Wife lack the style of the original authors, they more than make up for it in substance and sentiment.

“Every sort of trouble I can think of, we’ve tried it out – become expert at some of it, even, so much so that I’ve come to wonder whether artists in particular seek out hard times the way flowers turn their faces toward the sun” (142)

Jul 03, 2013
  • wendybird rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A interesting and well researched fictional account of F. Scott Fitzgerald's famous wife, Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald. No question, this is an intriguing & nicely crafted novel. I found the initial chapters more entertaining -- they flew by -- than those in the 2nd half of the book - which dragged - but to anyone familiar with the Fitzgerald bios, the subject matter may account for this feeling. Even having read all of F.Scott's novels, and at at least two biographies, the confusion surrounding Zelda's mental health later in life was explained if a plausible way (although, in a fictional voice, of course). I think Fowler does a terrific job of capturing the joy and tensions present in any long-term marriage, too, particularly those known as the original "Jazz Age" couple.

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