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Parade's End

(DVD - 2013 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Parade's End
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Set over a tumultuous ten-year period in the early 20th century, this five-hour HBO miniseries tells the story of an honorable Englishman coping with his growing disillusion at the end of a privileged era and the beginning of a new, egalitarian society. As the comfortable certainties of Edwardian England begin to give way to the chaos and destruction of WWI, nobleman Christopher Tietjens puts principles first by marrying Sylvia, a pretty, manipulative socialite who gives birth to a child who may not be his. Christopher endures his new wife's whims and overt indiscretions, foreseeing a cold future with Sylvia at his family's palatial estate, Groby Hall. He finds himself inexorably drawn to a young suffragette, Valentine Wannop, but refuses to give in to their mutual passion or end his marriage with Sylvia, who is alternately infuriated and infatuated by her incorruptible husband. The onset of war, combined with the advent of feminism at home, ushers in far-reaching changes for the English status quo, gradually eroding the constraints that have kept Christopher tethered to his aristocratic past.
Title: Parade's end
[videorecording]
Publisher: [New York, N.Y.] :, Home Box Office, Inc.,, [2013]
Edition: Widescreen presentation
Characteristics: 2 videodiscs (approximately 300 minutes) :,sound, color ;,4 3/4 in
Statement of Responsibility: HBO miniseries presents ; in association with the BBC ; a Mammoth Screen production ; in association with Trademark Films and BBC Worldwide and Lookout Point ; written by Tom Stoppard ; produced by David Parfitt and Selwyn Roberts ; directed by Susanna White
Notes: Based on the novels of Ford Madox Ford
Originally broadcast on television in Great Britain on BBC Two in 2012. Originally broadcast on television in the United States on HBO in 2013
"HBO Home Entertainment"--Container
Bonus feature: Tom Stoppard interview on KCRW's The treatment with Elvis Mitchell
Number of discs, special features, and language options may vary by copy
Summary: Set over a tumultuous ten-year period in the early 20th century, this five-hour HBO miniseries tells the story of an honorable Englishman coping with his growing disillusion at the end of a privileged era and the beginning of a new, egalitarian society. As the comfortable certainties of Edwardian England begin to give way to the chaos and destruction of WWI, nobleman Christopher Tietjens puts principles first by marrying Sylvia, a pretty, manipulative socialite who gives birth to a child who may not be his. Christopher endures his new wife's whims and overt indiscretions, foreseeing a cold future with Sylvia at his family's palatial estate, Groby Hall. He finds himself inexorably drawn to a young suffragette, Valentine Wannop, but refuses to give in to their mutual passion or end his marriage with Sylvia, who is alternately infuriated and infatuated by her incorruptible husband. The onset of war, combined with the advent of feminism at home, ushers in far-reaching changes for the English status quo, gradually eroding the constraints that have kept Christopher tethered to his aristocratic past.
Branch Call Number: DVD Drama PARADES
Distributor: Burbank, CA :, Distributed by Warner Home Video,, [2013]
Country of Producing Entity: Great Britain
Performers: Rebecca Hall, Benedict Cumberbatch, Roger Allam, Adelaide Clemens, Anne-Marie Duff, Rupert Everett, Stephen Graham, Janet McTeer, Miranda Richardson.
System Details: DVD, region 1, widescreen (16:9) presentation; Dolby Digital 5.1 surround (English and French) and 2.0 (Spanish)
Other Language: In English, dubbed French or dubbed Spanish, with optional subtitles in English, Spanish or French; closed-captioned
Subject Headings: Ford, Ford Madox, 1873-1939 Television adaptations World War, 1914-1918 England Drama Man-woman relationships England Drama Triangles (Interpersonal relations) England Drama Marriage England Drama Aristocracy (Social class) England Drama Suffragists England Drama Feminism England Drama Great Britain History 20th century Drama Great Britain Social conditions 20th century Drama Guerra Mundial I, 1914-1918 Teatro. bidex Relaciones hombre-mujer Teatro. bidex
Genre/Form: Television melodramas
Television mini-series
Television adaptations
Historical television programs
Television programs
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
Fiction television programs
Topical Term: World War, 1914-1918
Man-woman relationships
Triangles (Interpersonal relations)
Marriage
Aristocracy (Social class)
Suffragists
Feminism
Guerra Mundial I, 1914-1918
Relaciones hombre-mujer
Publisher No: 1000385537 Home Box Office
4000042214 Home Box Office
3000051251 Home Box Office
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Opinion

From Library Staff

Set over a tumultuous ten-year period in the early 20th century, this miniseries tells the story of an honorable Englishman coping with his growing disillusion at the end of a privileged era and the beginning of a new, egalitarian society. Based on the tetralogy by Ford Madox Ford.


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Aug 22, 2014
  • roshen rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

The leading lady was way too young for Benedict Cumberbatch. In the end I just felt so sorry for the wife who really tried hard to win back his affections.

Aug 16, 2014
  • harrybrowne rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

I have not read the book, but I hope it is better than this vulgar, preachy dramatization. A pitiful waste of the enormous talent of Benedict Cumberbatch, who is superb here. His range of expressions and screen presence is compelling. Other actors are awful. Musical score, and the depiction of the utter insanity of war, are the only other good things.

This is a wonderful adaptation of Ford Maddox Ford's books, which are also terrific.

Jul 21, 2014
  • burmal rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A well done, entertaining period piece about a troubled couple and the people around them. HIghly recommended. I am now interested in reading the book.

Jul 12, 2014
  • Anne_Louise_2000 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

This was an amazing production in many ways: The costumes, the sets, the depiction of the war, especially. I had read the books before I watched this, and was glad I had: There are many, many subplots. While Tom Stoppard did an excellent job at adapting it, I think I would have found it difficult to track without some background knowledge. For me, the biggest drawback to this production is that in the book, Christopher-the main lead-is a great roly-poly bear of a man: think Chris Farley. He's described as physically quite unattractive (I'm paraphrasing, but I recall Ford describing him as pillows stacked together) but his intellect is great and he is principled. Benedict Cumberbatch is a great actor, but he didn't carry off being uncomfortable in his own skin (my guess is he wasn't asked to). Rebecca Hall, playing his wife Sylvia, never seemed physically repelled by him. Annoyed, irritated, yes. Repulsed, no. Because they dropped this part of it out, the motivations for Sylvia don't make a lot of sense (I'd rather go to a nunnery than sleep with you!). I think Sylvia is the most interesting character: She falls in love with Christopher's principles and intellect, but can't get over that she finds him repulsive, resents the fact that she is attached to and finding herself attracted to someone who is physically unattractive, and moreover, she is being punished for being Catholic and beautiful and takes it out on him. Mostly, she takes it out on him. The only other problem is Adelaide Clemens, the actress they have playing Valentine looks about twelve. Ew!

Mar 26, 2014
  • BertBailey rated this: 4.5 stars out of 5.

For those impatient with the facile chumminess of Downton Abbey's aristocrats, and its Dallas-on-the-moors veneers, this made-for-TV series is a must-see. This is a far truer, more realistic portrayal of Edwardian England based on a novel by FM Ford, a fine writer--though a less-than-considerate "bounder" by his own and others' accounts (see "Quartet," with Alan Bates, Maggie Smith and Isabelle Adjani). It is far more clear-eyed about the times, that scene and those people, and so much less "about the gowns." So expect a tale full of insufferable snobberry, nasty prejudices and very crippling repressions. I gather in the book the male lead is quite detestable, unlike as Benedict Cumberbatch delivers him, 'though the virtue of this production is that, among others, I'll be reading it! The female lead may be a bit too liberated for a full century ago, but that's no great sin; it's almost plausible, since she's paired with a hyper-principled but little-boyish man. Cumberbatch does well, stiff and lugubrious but far more human than in the "Sherlock" series (and equipped with a superb voice, up there with Burton and Jeremy Irons). Perhaps in her best role yet, Rebecca Hall, as ever, is swan-like beautiful yet sometimes also verges on duck-ugly, making her totally enchanting to watch. Both prove themselves top-drawer leads in plum roles, and well-launched toward big cinematic things. And there's no lack of good support from the rest of the solid cast. The art direction--including some grim Edwardian dresses, rooms and castles that alternate with their opposite counterparts in gorgeousness--is second to none. Highest recommendation.

all 4 for holds and 3 more on order

in the book, the characters aren't such stereotypes. it's like Ford is making a point but in a more subtle way. What the film does is simplify this somewhat difficult novel to make it easier to get the point. the result is exaggerated, cartoon characters. The main character (Christopher) is so uptight and repressed and proper; in contrast, his wife (Sylvia) is a spoiled brat; but in the film she's incomprehensible -- a modern "liberated" woman grafted onto the character in the book -- the film character is a character who could not have existed in the 19th century and who doesn't exist in Ford's book. The film's exaggerated contrast between the husband and wife comes out of an idea that The Eng. have -- a black and white idea of aristocratic control versus bestial instincts -- interesting how this definition coincides with the divine right of kings, who were often debauched gluttons (this is how the aristocrats see themselves as superior to everyone who isn't English. Ironically, the lower classes also see themselves as superior to foreigners by virtue of being British, even though the upper crust sees them as beastly -- the uppers don't mind the lowers basking in reflected glory because it helps to keep them in their place )

Oct 09, 2013
  • brontelit87 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

Benedict Cumberbatch gives a fine performance in this TV miniseries! I'm a fan of Cumberbatch, and this is definitely one of his best roles to date! (In this particular role, the pitch of his voice reminds me of Shere Khan in Disney's _The Jungle Book_ and the TV series, _Talespin_). Cumberbatch's character is very complex and therefore extremely interesting. I just did not understand Rebecca Hall's character. I liked Adelaide Clemens & Roger Allam. Although the story is a little drawn out & there are a few unnecessary scenes, it's still a very good production. Cumberbatch definitely should have won an Emmy for this role. I highly recommend this title for the superb acting.

Oct 05, 2013
  • 22950006357453 rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

sherlocks' wife is in iron man 3!

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app02 Version sidamo (sidamo) Last updated 2014/09/17 15:16