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The Triple Package

How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America
Chua, Amy (Book - 2014 )
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
The Triple Package
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"It may be taboo to say, but some groups in America do better than others.Why do some groups rise? Drawing on groundbreaking original research and startling statistics, The Triple Package uncovers the secret to their success. A superiority complex, insecurity, impulse control--these are the elements of the Triple Package, the rare and potent cultural constellation that drives disproportionate group success.Americans are taught that everyone is equal, that no group is superior to another. But remarkably, all of America's most successful groups believe (even if they don't say so aloud) that they're exceptional, chosen, superior in some way. Americans are taught that self-esteem--feeling good about yourself--is the key to a successful life. But in all of America's most successful groups, people tend to feel insecure, inadequate, that they have to prove themselves. But the Triple Package has a dark underside too. Each of its elements carries distinctive pathologies; when taken to an extreme, they can have truly toxic effects. Should people strive for the Triple Package? Should America? Ultimately, the authors conclude that the Triple Package is a ladder that should be climbed and then kicked away, drawing on its power but breaking free from its constraints"-- Provided by publisher.
Authors: Chua, Amy
Title: The triple package
how three unlikely traits explain the rise and fall of cultural groups in America
Publisher: New York, New York :, The Penguin Press,, 2014
Characteristics: 320 pages ;,25 cm
Statement of Responsibility: Amy Chua, Jed Rubenfeld
Summary: "It may be taboo to say, but some groups in America do better than others.Why do some groups rise? Drawing on groundbreaking original research and startling statistics, The Triple Package uncovers the secret to their success. A superiority complex, insecurity, impulse control--these are the elements of the Triple Package, the rare and potent cultural constellation that drives disproportionate group success.Americans are taught that everyone is equal, that no group is superior to another. But remarkably, all of America's most successful groups believe (even if they don't say so aloud) that they're exceptional, chosen, superior in some way. Americans are taught that self-esteem--feeling good about yourself--is the key to a successful life. But in all of America's most successful groups, people tend to feel insecure, inadequate, that they have to prove themselves. But the Triple Package has a dark underside too. Each of its elements carries distinctive pathologies; when taken to an extreme, they can have truly toxic effects. Should people strive for the Triple Package? Should America? Ultimately, the authors conclude that the Triple Package is a ladder that should be climbed and then kicked away, drawing on its power but breaking free from its constraints"-- Provided by publisher.
Additional Contributors: Rubenfeld, Jed - 1959-
ISBN: 1594205469
9781594205460
Branch Call Number: 305.5 C55926t 2014
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references and index
Subject Headings: American Dream Success United States Ethnic groups United States Personality United States Temperament United States
Topical Term: American Dream
Success
Ethnic groups
Personality
Temperament
LCCN: 2013039970
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May 27, 2014
  • writermala rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

I picked up this book only because it was coauthored by Amy Chua, the writer of "Battle Hymn of the tiger mom." "Triple Package", while still dealing with success, and in particular, success by specific groups within America, was much more controlled. The book, by Chua and her husband Rubenfeld, talks about the premise, that the three traits of Superiority Complex, Insecurity, and Impulse control, all combined together, is largely responsible for certain ethnic and cultural groups within America. While this sounds counter-intuitive and paradoxical, I found the authors make their case so well and support their arguments so well with facts and statistics that it is difficult to argue with. I liked this book even more than "Battle Hymn...

May 18, 2014
  • Vincent T Lombardo rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This is one of the best and most important books that I have ever read! Deeply researched, well written, and intellectually stimulating, it debunks a lot of conventional wisdom about how to succeed, such as high self-esteem is a prerequisite to success. The book is practically a self-help guide on how to succeed in the United States, although Chua and Rubenfeld do not pull any punches about the dark side of The Triple Package. This book should be read by every parent, educator, politician, and technocrat who shapes public policy. It is not popular to say, but culture matters!!!

Apr 22, 2014
  • StarGladiator rated this: 0.5 stars out of 5.

The basic and underlying assumptions of what some reviewers have called a racist diatribe require that the reader fully accepts the fantasy of an American meritocracy, and that Amy Chua did not receive extra points on her college admissions for being a minority? (She would no doubt bristle at this, but we are talking the facts, aren't we?) So the Mormon political family of Romney, which fled Mexico with a mysterious amount of money of mysterious origins, to evade the Mexican authorities, have a "secret" to their success, which these authors aren't going to divulge? The Indian immigrants, sponsored by hedge funds and corporations as "legal" foreign scab workers, don't have an edge to begin with? Cuban immigrants had many benefits other groups didn't, simply go back and read over federal government legislation (an unheard of American pastime). Indian immigrant, Gupta, now in jail for insider trading, is profiled in "The Billionaire's Apprentice" in which the Indian-American business author, on p. 139, explains a strong negative to the American worker, and a plus for the Indian scab worker - - do read it. Never depend upon an attorney pushing an agenda, especially two of them! 2014 in America may be a dangerous time for a Jewish-American like Rubenfeld espousing Jewish superiority given the names of some of the major perpetrators of the global economic meltdown: Robert Rubin, Alan Greenspan, Larry Summers (legally changed from Samuelson), John Paulson, Lloyd Blankfein, Arthur Leavitt, Neal Wolin, Timothy Geithner, Jack Lew and on and on. (And then there's that super-criminal, Bernie Madoff!) Unfamiliar with the special foreign visa category called "EB5" ? Read about that, and you'll understand how it would skew the statistics on Chinese immigrants and earnings. Two of the most underrated figures in American history (not groups, I know) are Alexander Hamilton, from Barbados, who was George Washington's chief of staff during all of Washington's successful military campaigns (and first Secretary of the US Treasury, and tried to promote the first national industrial policy, et cetera), and Nikola Tesla, from Serbia, the father of the power grid (without which there would be no electrical devices nor high tech). Neither fell into any of the groups cited. [Possibly Rubenfeld is thinking of subsidized Jews, like treasury secretary Jack Lew, who couldn't pay off his mortgage loans, but New York University did for him, no doubt because he ended collective bargaining rights there among the grad student assistants, and who received his Citigroup bonus paid from TARP bailout funds, or taxpayer monies? And also, David Brooks, who has never worked at a real job in his life, but spews forth from the stink tank, the Brookings Institution.]

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Version pocillo (pocillo) Last updated 2014/08/29 09:56