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Julie and Julia

365 Days, 524 Recipes, 1 Tiny Apartment Kitchen : How One Girl Risked Her Marriage, Her Job, and Her Sanity to Master the Art of Living

Powell, Julie

(eBook - 2005)
Average Rating: 3.5 stars out of 5.
Julie and Julia
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Julie Powell is 30 years old, living in a rundown apartment in Queens and working at a secretarial job that's going nowhere. She needs something to break the monotony of her life, and she invents a deranged assignment. She will cook all 524 recipes in Julia Child's 1961 classic Mastering the Art of French Cooking. In the span of one year. At first she thinks it will be easy, but as she moves from simple potato soup into more complicated realms, she realizes there's more to Mastering the Art than meets the eye. She haunts the local butcher, buying kidneys and sweetbreads. She rarely serves dinner before midnight. She discovers how to mold the perfect Orange Bavarian, the trick to extracting marrow from bone, and the intense pleasure of eating liver. And somewhere along the line she realizes she has eclipsed her life's ordinariness through humor, hysteria, and perseverance.--From publisher description.
Publisher: New York : Little, Brown and Company, 2005
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780316135481
Branch Call Number: OverDrive downloadable ebook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc
Alternate Title: Julie and Julia

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Aug 07, 2013
  • artemishi rated this: 3 stars out of 5.

I enjoyed the movie, which is what moved me to pick up the book. Honestly, I could have just stuck with the movie. It's not that the book is bad, it just left me with no emotional takeaway. Julie Powell uses Mastering the Art of French Cooking, and Julia Child, to find meaning in her life. Except that we never see how that's accomplished, if it is in any way, as apparently blogging about such a feat is what REALLY brought meaning to her life (in terms of a job opportunity). What we do see is an often hysterical, quite self-depricating, funny but occasionally too bitter for my tastes 29 year old panicking about getting old and having a crap job. And also about cooking. I enjoyed most her explanations about how each recipe was done (as I don't speak French, hearing a firsthand account about stripping marrow from bones, for example was both funny and educational). What I liked least was the fact that she apparently throws tantrums a lot, and in the book she makes no excuses for it (which is fine) but it happens so often that is just seems....pointless. And distracting. I appreciate that she portrayed her marriage as very even-keel and balanced, and she apparently became a tinge less judgmental (of friends, anyway- members of an opposing political party are fair game) by the end of her year-long journey. Also, maybe this bitter cynicism and holier-than-thou crap is a New Yorker thing? In which case, that was educational as well.

In my honest opinion, if you are looking for a "year in the life" book, fascinated by the early days of blogging, or need some support that you are not alone in being frustrated by French cooking, this is a good book to pick up.

Mar 31, 2011
  • vwruleschick rated this: 2 stars out of 5.

It was OK story, I thought there would be more - has similar feel like Eat, Love, Pray. It was a book I could put down, as it didn't feed that interest in me. Also be prepared some American political views.

Mar 11, 2011
  • lilwordworm rated this: 2.5 stars out of 5.

It was plain but it was cute. I can’t cook but it made me want to try some of the recipes.

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