Yes, No, Maybe So

Yes, No, Maybe So

Book - 2020 | First edition
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Jamie Goldberg, who chokes when speaking to strangers, and Maya Rehrman, who is having the worst Ramadan ever, are paired to knock on doors and ask for votes for the local state senate candidate.
Publisher: New York, NY : Balzer + Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers, [2020]
Edition: First edition
Copyright Date: ©2020
ISBN: 9780062937049
0062937049
9780062983794
0062983792
Call Number: y ALBERTALL 2020
Characteristics: 436 pages ; 22 cm
Additional Contributors: Saeed, Aisha - Author

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Grades 9 and up. Jamie Goldberg, who chokes when speaking to strangers, and Maya Rehrman, who is having the worst Ramadan ever, are paired to knock on doors and ask for votes for the local state senate candidate.


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d
devanshi_bhargava
Aug 29, 2020

Jamie Goldberg is undergoing one of the busiest summers ever. From having to give a speech at his sister's Bat Mitzvah to going door to door canvassing with someone he had lost touch with years ago, this was truly going to be an unwelcome challenge for the shy, tongue-tied teen. Maya Rehman's summer wasn't going any better. With her parents in the middle of a separation during Ramadan, her college-bound bestie going MIA, and being forced to politically canvas for a local election with some random boy, she was not having fun.
But when the small local election turns into a battle of keeping the town's islamophobia and anti-hijab legislation at bay, suddenly, there's a lot more at stake. Jamie and Maya find a whole new meaning behind their summer, and along the way, just might navigate the troubles of anti-semitism, islamophobia, intter-racial relationships, and a newfound teenage romance. This was a really good book, and the entire time I found myself enjoying it.
The reason for this is other than being an extremely cute romance that took its time to build, it also dealt with some serious issues in today’s society. It was one of the first YA Romance novels I had read that centered around politics, also handling delicate topics such as islamophobia and anti-sematism. This was refreshing to read, and the light in which these heavy topics were written about helped make the severity of them known to the readers, in a way that when reading it, we were able to learn from it as well and walk away with not only an entertaining story, but more knowledge on the issues that plague us.

h
hitikshab
Jul 15, 2020

Age Rating: 14-18

This novel follows the story of two teens, Jamie Goldberg and Maya Rehman, the opposite figures. Where Maya can speak her mind freely, Jamie can hardly speak his mind to anyone at all. Where Maya is free-spirited and open, Jamie is a closed-off and shy. As Jamie volunteers his summertime for the local state senate, Maya unexpectedly finds herself along with him. But neither Jamie nor Maya thought they would be political canvassing across Georgia that summer, much less did they their story would be romantic if anything. As two childhood friends find themselves falling for each other over hot summer afternoons knocking on strangers' doors, Maya and Jamie start to think their summer wasn't so bad after all.

I loved how this story was written from both characters' viewpoints, it added so much to the story and I felt like it really highlighted each of the characters individually. Overall loved how the story included not only a typical love story, but also important political viewpoints encompassing several racial issues America faces today, friendship, family issues, and more.

j
JerryJennings
Jul 04, 2020

Two bestselling authors Becky Albertalli and Aisha Saeed are the co-authors of Yes, No, Maybe So a new (2020) YA novel. I like stories with well defined appealing characters and an interesting plot. Yes, No, Maybe So has both.

This story is timely. It focuses on two seventeen year olds who were close playmates when they 4 through 7 years old and haven’t seen each other since. Now they are in the summer before their senior year and they meet again. They are Jamie Goldberg, who is Jewish and white, and Maya Rehman, who is Pakistani-American and Muslim. They reconnect when pressured by their mothers to work on the campaign of a progressive Georgia State Senate candidate.

There is a lot going on between Jamie and Maya. Their families are different. Their, though different, personalities mesh and they become friends while they also becoming very committed to the campaign they are working. Their friendship leads to crushes.

The two authors take us on a jam packed ride through a month, or so of Maya’s and Jamie’s friendship, family drama, election drama, self learning, fighting for a cause, cultural awareness and budding crush. It is a good read. Enjoy. Great characters and good plot!

l
lissa_adamson
Jun 15, 2020

Okay, it took me foreverrrrr to get into this book. Slow burn doesn't begin to cover it. But! At some point, I realized I was invested, in the budding relationship, the political race, their desire and confidence and drive when spreading the word against HB 28. At some point, I realized how much I loved these characters and how much I wanted them to win.

Albertali and Saeed do an incredible job painting a realistic picture of their environments, and relationships, both familial and societal. This is the second book of Albertali's that I ugly cried reading, that's a 100% chance of tears, and I guarantee won't be my last.

s
samcmar17
Feb 24, 2020

Huge thank you to Harper Collins Canada for this ARC!

I love me a cute and unlikely romance. I am not a huge romance reader per say, but I have enjoyed many stories by Becky Albertalli, though this book was my first real foray into Aisha Saeed's works.

Yes No Maybe So is a book about voting, societal values, and political action. The friendship turned romance in this story is definitely one readers will root for. Jamie and Maya's friendship is chockful of fun, humour, and it's completely genuine from start to finish. While Jamie and Maya spend time going door-to-door to canvass in an upcoming election, both characters find commonality in their backgrounds -- Jamie being Jewish, and Maya being Muslim.

What I loved about this story is how genuine both perspectives in the story feel. I feel like readers could easily be friends with either Jamie or Maya, and I feel like they are real people and more than just fictional characters. With this story being politically charged, it offers readers a glimpse into looking at issues of racism, prejudice, and even just how broken the American voting system is. I will say, I loved Maya's chapters over Jamie's, but I think it's because Maya is a bit more closed off and the reader has to work a bit harder to feel like they know her. Saeed does an amazing job of making Maya into this onion who needs each layer to be peeled back until you get to her very kind core.

I think most readers will definitely enjoy Yes No Maybe So. It's just such a fun story, and I think it handles the political elements very well to readers who may be unfamiliar. This book also makes me want to check out more by Aisha Saeed, as a feel like I've now discovered a new author to enjoy. Yes No Maybe So is charming, entertaining, and it will pull your heartstrings in such a wonderful, if predictable way.

LPL_MaryW Jan 09, 2020

Seventeen-year-olds Jamie and Maya can’t vote, but they can volunteer in the campaign of their state senate candidate. Jamie’s excited to get involved, but the fact that he’s expected to give a speech at his sister’s bat mitzvah is giving him hella anxiety. Maya needs a distraction from her parents’ separation (during Ramadan of all times!), and her bestie keeps cancelling their plans. When white supremacists target the campaign, and a congressional supermajority threatens to pass an Islamophobic bill, Maya and Jamie realize their activism is more important than ever. Featuring masculine sensitivity, realistic outcomes, and the cutest love story you’ve ever heard, you’ll be going door-to-door raving about this book!

debwalker Jan 08, 2020

"Shelf Talker: A Jewish boy and a Muslim girl campaign for an election in this politically charged YA "slowmance" about the power of local activism."

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