Cloud Atlas

Cloud Atlas

A Novel

Book - 2004
Average Rating:
54
3
1
 …
Rate this:
Recounts the connected stories of people from the past and the distant future, from a nineteenth-century notary and an investigative journalist in the 1970s to a young man who searches for meaning in a post-apocalyptic world.
Publisher: New York : Random House Trade Paperbacks, c2004
Edition: 1st U.S. ed
ISBN: 9780375507250
0375507256
Branch Call Number: FICTION MITCHELL
Characteristics: 509 p. ; 22 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

This is a hard book to do a synopsis of, but basically, a lot of very different kinds of characters live out their lives from 1850 to a postapocalyptic Iron Age Hawaii. Eventually their disparate lives intertwine. This is experimental and very original.

This book spans 6 different times but does it tell 6 different stories or just revisit the same one over and over?

A thought-provoking adventure that takes place in six very different periods, with different (but related?) characters, ranging between the mid-19th century and the far future on a mostly ruined Earth. -Phoebe

Six interlinking stories span eras and worlds, exploring the themes of reincarnation and the connection of souls.

This novel explores how disparate people connect, how their fates intertwine, and how their souls drift across time like clouds across the sky.


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

h
harrissusanc
Jun 26, 2017

This makes a good summer epic novel because it begins and ends on the trade ship the Prophetess in the early 19th century, no matter the wind blows through six narrators and genres, past and future, with devious connection. The highly stylized English is a contagious tour de force. Mitchell "mem'ry(d)" the 2017 literary and geopolitical universe in 2004 in Cloud Atlas. For less puzzler, read The Bone Clocks.

b
BREATHLESSMAHONEY
May 22, 2017

I got it but it seemed the the author was pretty sure you wouldn't so parts of it felt forced.

s
sgcf
Mar 26, 2017

I am quite awe-struck with these six novellas, interlinked and unfolding through time … and time again. Mitchell inspires my complete admiration for his ability to totally immerse each one in the language and style of the era and genre in which each is set. And in each story, regardless of how soul-searching or humorously hyperbolic, he has us reflect on the big questions of life. While it is reported that the characters from story to story are reincarnations from previous lifetimes, I found this was not as clearly communicated in the book as in the movie. Now I’d like to go back and read the book again.

j
jferrerosa2
Mar 08, 2017

This novel is not an easy read, and must've been difficult to write. Mitchell is using various genres going from one point to another with stories. The best one, by far, is the story of Sonmi. I think many would agree to this. The overall effect is disjointed, but not nearly as bad as the film. It has the potential to be great, but I think loses a lot of readers with its first story. I personally enjoyed it, but many non-literary people out there probably find this book annoying.

l
LouWSytsma
Dec 07, 2016

Mitchell has an amazing ability to sculpture his writing to create the moods and tones of different time eras. To go from different time periods and not only write each differently from one another yet maintain a consistent vision through out them all is staggering.

t
tjdickey
Aug 03, 2016

A "sextet for overlapping soloists," to use the author's words from later in the volume: an elegant counterpoint of six stories, six literary genres, six authorial voices, six narrative structures in chiastic form. A "matryoshka doll" of interlocking human histories. Well worth the reading.

TSCPL_ChrisB Jun 03, 2016

...it is difficult not to stand in awe at Mitchell's raw talent. Whether he's writing a journal as an eighteenth century notary aboard an ocean vessel, the letters of a priggish English composer, a suspenseful tale of corruption and the journalist who uncovers it, the vain musings of a publisher with a belief that he is akin to Randle Patrick McMurphy, the interview of a clone guilty for her rebellion against a capitalist totalitarian government, or the post-apocalyptic oral stories of adventure by a primitive tribesman, Mitchell writes perfectly. One minute Mitchell's writing mirrors Melville, the next Margaret Atwood or a more literate Tom Clancy, then Toni Morrison.

Mitchell's talent is clear, but what his aim was is not so transparent. The thread that connects these stories is often thin. Regardless, this makes them no less intriguing. Even the many stories that move slowly are entertaining in their own unique way.

Cloud Altas is the kind of novel that takes determination and patience, but it doesn't require complete understanding. Sometimes it's okay to just sit back and be mystified by it all.

l
lukasevansherman
Dec 16, 2015

Wow, people really like this book. I'll admit I didn't read it until after the movie came out, a movie I had no interest in (although who doesn't look non-Asian actors playing Asians?). Plenty of smarter folks than I am think this book is some kind of masterpiece. And it is virtuosic to be sure, with it's dazzling blend of styles and possibly interconnected plot lines, but is sure isn't much fun to read. I dare anybody to read the "Sloosha's Crossin' An' Ev'rythin' After" section out loud without snickering. Heck, just read that title. I don't get the fuss, but this is certainly hermetic post-modern wankery on the vastest, most self-indulgent scale.

s
stellamd
Dec 06, 2015

Mitchell is a great storyteller, but his structure seemed somewhat contrived after the first half of the book. By then I was getting tired of it. It seemed a gimmick rather than a necessary tool to further the narrative.

k
katyakatyak
Aug 10, 2015

I chose this as my Destination: Imagination book for the Summer reading challenge.

View All Comments

Summary

Add a Summary

s
sbn_kc
Aug 04, 2013

A convoluted mess that wanders along several threads. Found the one interesting thread and finished it across several chapters, then gave up on the book.

Luv2cNewThings Jul 12, 2013

The reader follows a group of different people through reincarnations - starting with Adam Ewing. It seems that regardless if a character lived a full life or not, his or her story goes on.

The reader also goes on a passage of time. He/she will reach the pinnacle of humanity, which falls and starts all over again for a lack of better terminology!

On a side note: It was interesting how David Mitchell structured the novel. Unfortunately, it simply did not keep my interest.

AnneDromeda Jan 07, 2013

David Mitchell’s *Cloud Atlas,* released in 2004, fits the definition of a sleeper hit. Ridiculously well reviewed, its unconventional composition threw many early readers. It took time for word of mouth to spread from those tenacious readers who made it far enough into the book to make sense of Mitchell’s ambitious project. Eventually, even Hollywood caught on, so those of you who’re interested in the premise but frustrated by the execution can go take it all in on the silver screen right now. You could. But I really think you should read the book first, and not just because I’m a librarian.<br />

*Cloud Atlas* is composed of six separate stories fit together like matroishka dolls. It begins with the epistolary narrative of a man at sea in the South Pacific in the 1860s, witnessing the last gasps of the slave trade and the messy, colonial birth of global capitalism and industrialism. The flowery writing perfectly suits a 19th-century adventure tale full of pirates, sailing, exploring and riches. However, just as the action begins to really pick up, the narrative ends mid-sentence.<br />

Another – seemingly unrelated – narrative begins. It follows the couch-surfing adventures of a brilliant composer named Robert Frobisher through 1930s Europe. Full of witty, Wildean dialogue, this narrative is more than entertaining enough to carry the reader through to Frobisher’s discovery of a book sharing the title of *Cloud Atlas*’s interrupted opening narrative in the South Pacific. <br />

Having just gotten readers comfortable, Mitchell again shifts focus; this time, we land in a 1970s-era spy thriller that references Frobisher. Why? No explanation’s given, and the narrative breaks again. Now we follow the head of a vanity publishing house through a comedy of errors leaving him imprisoned in a nursing home in our current time. Then we jump to the testimony of a human clone genetically optimized for food service, testifying her experience living in a hyper-commercialized dystopian version of future-Korea to a corporate archivist. Then we land in post-apocalyptic Hawai’i, where an elder tells his life story in orature. This narrative is the deepest in the layered intertextuality of *Cloud Atlas* – after hearing Zachary Bailey’s life story we move in reverse order back through the other half of the nesting narratives begun earlier in the novel.<br/ >

Technically composed of six well-crafted novellas interlaced in unexpected ways, the weighty consequence of each narrative relies on all the others to be fully realized. *Cloud Atlas* could alternatively have been titled Frankfurt School’s Instrumental Reason: The Novel, but those with no background in Continental philosophy will still find much to love here, if they take the time. *Cloud Atlas* is highly recommended to fans of Margaret Atwood, Ursula K Le Guin or any literary science fiction. It is also recommended to any readers of literary fiction who don’t mind some serious experimentation, and who love beautifully crafted language.

Quotes

Add a Quote

Laura_X Jun 01, 2016

I lost my balance when the train pulled away, but a human crumple zone buffered my fall. We stayed like that, half fallen. Diagonal People.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at MCL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top