Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Book - 1996
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A masterpiece ahead of its time, a prescient rendering of a dark future, and the inspiration for the blockbuster film Blade Runner --now in a sharp new edition with an introduction by New York Times bestselling author Jason M. Hough

By 2021, the World War has killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet. Those who remain covet any living creature, and for people who can't afford one, companies built incredibly realistic simulacra: horses, birds, cats, sheep. They've even built humans. Immigrants to Mars receive androids so sophisticated they are indistinguishable from true men or women. Fearful of the havoc these artificial humans can wreak, the government bans them from Earth. Driven into hiding, unauthorized androids live among human beings, undetected. Rick Deckard, an officially sanctioned bounty hunter, is commissioned to find rogue androids and "retire" them. But when cornered, androids fight back--with lethal force.

Praise for Philip K. Dick

"The most consistently brilliant science fiction writer in the world." --John Brunner

"A kind of pulp-fiction Kafka, a prophet." -- The New York Times

"[Philip K. Dick] sees all the sparkling--and terrifying--possibilities . . . that other authors shy away from." -- Rolling Stone
Publisher: New York : Ballantine Books, 1996, c1968
Edition: 1st Ballantine Books trade pbk. ed
ISBN: 9780345404473
0345404475
Branch Call Number: SF DICK
Characteristics: x, 244 p. ; 21 cm

Opinion

From Library Staff

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was published in 1968. Grim and foreboding, even today it is a masterpiece ahead of its time. By 2021, the World War had killed millions, driving entire species into extinction and sending mankind off-planet.


From the critics


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v
VonHafenstaaad
Jun 05, 2017

"You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity."
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a science fiction masterpiece by Philip K. Dick (PKD) that also served as the inspiration for the movie Blade Runner. It was first published in 1968.

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Calvacade
Apr 19, 2017

If you read this book thinking that your about to read Blade Runner, think again. It's not representative of that great film, in terms tone and story. The only thing it has in common is the overall plot line, a cop tracks several androids in order to retire them. Where as Blade Runner looked at them in a Hollywood bounty hunter/prison break style, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep explores the story from the idea of how real does fake have to be in order for the distinction to become irrelevant. Superbly written and succinctly explored, this is one of the greatest science fiction books written, by one of the most prolific writers of the genre.

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nbradley2
Apr 13, 2017

This book explores several concepts left out of the film (mercerism) or de-emphasized throughout the film (inorganic animals), so there is a lot to appreciate about this book even for die-hard fans of Blade Runner. While in some areas the plot of this book could be tighter or made more significant by building tension and character development, reading this book has bolstered my love for the film as it has proved to be a separate but related experience, adding "new" details to the world formed in the film, "new" complexities to Rick Deckard's character, and "new" questions to wrestle with. This book is a must-read for those interested in philosophy of mind, cybernetics, AI, the question of what it means to be human, and the question of identity/memories.

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Andrew Kyle Bacon
Aug 12, 2016

This book is not as good as the film "Blade Runner", but at the same time has material in it that would greatly improve the film. Here we find P.K. Dick questioning what it means to be human, and what it means to love. Other interesting points are a facades we build around us in order to impress our neighbors. Very interesting book.

AL_JEREMIAH Aug 09, 2016

In a post-nuclear setting where most of the earth is ruined, a bounty hunter tries to find and kill six escaped (very life-like) new androids. The overall theme is on empathy, and what it is (exactly) that makes humans different from androids. It’s a rather sad story with an underlying sense of guilt from the characters (one of the sure qualities that distinguishes a human from an android). PKD often made his points very cleverly and subtly, like in this novel, requiring you to really think about what the story is saying.

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kwsmith
Jul 05, 2016

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, like many other Science Fiction novels, raises thoughtful questions about why we believe that humans are so special. Set in a richly detailed post-apocalyptic world, this short novel is packed full with powerful symbols and deep themes. What exactly does it mean to be human?

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elliottcampbell
Jun 12, 2016

Vol 4 starts the build towards the climax of the novel. Thought-provoking.

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elliottcampbell
May 26, 2016

Great graphic novel adaptation of Dick's novel. The first installment makes the text very accessible, more so than otherwise as Dick's text is unabridged.

CMLibrary_sfetzer May 17, 2016

After World War Terminus, when most people have fled to the colonies on Mars, Richard Deckard is still on Earth. He works “retiring” replicants-- androids that have escaped to Earth. Richard is barely scraping by and longs to purchase a real animal to replace the electric sheep he is forced to tend in order to keep up appearances. One day an opportunity falls into his lap as six replicants need to be retired, and the bounty is a thousand dollars each. Through Deckard’s quest, concepts of human empathy and the differences between humans and androids are explored. The book upon which the movie Blade Runner is loosely based, this book is a treat for any fan of science fiction.

Veepea Nov 03, 2015

I have tried several times to like the movie "Blade Runner" with no success. A coworker recommended that I read the book and I was very glad that I did. The book has much more complex and interesting themes, it was much more real and relatable. Of course, Philip Dick is a fantastical author so there are always weird and unexpected bits. I liked so the novel so much that I even tried "Blade Runner" again. I could see glimpses of the novel here and there but there is not much in common between the two.

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PimaLib_JB Oct 28, 2014

“Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday's homeopape. When nobody's around, kipple reproduces itself. For instance, if you go to bed leaving any kipple around your apartment, when you wake up the next morning there's twice as much of it. It always gets more and more."

PimaLib_JB Oct 28, 2014

“Kipple is useless objects, like junk mail or match folders after you use the last match or gum wrappers or yesterday's homeopape. When nobody's around, kipple reproduces itself. For instance, if you go to bed leaving any kipple around your apartment, when you wake up the next morning there's twice as much of it. It always gets more and more."

l
LazyNeko
Oct 19, 2011

He thought, too, about his need for a real animal; within him an actual hatred once more manifested itself toward his electric sheep, which he had to tend, had to care about, as if it lived. The tyranny of an object, he thought. It doesn't know I exist. Like the androids, it had no ability to appreciate the existence of another.

Wolvie Aug 12, 2009

You will be required to do wrong no matter where you go. It is the basic condition of life, to be required to violate your own identity. At some time, every creature which lives must do so. It is the ultimate shadow, the defeat of creation; this is the curse at work, the curse that feeds on all life. Everywhere in the universe.

d
DavidB
May 10, 2009

I'm seeing one of them for the the first time. And they damn near did it; they came awfully damn close to undermining the Voigt-Kampff scale, the only method we have for detecting them. The Rosen Association does a good job -- makes a good try, anyhow -- at protecting its products. And I have to face six more of them, he reflected. Before I'm finished. He would earn the bounty money. Every cent. Assuming he made it through alive.

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sannuus
Oct 29, 2013

sannuus thinks this title is suitable for 8 years and over

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everydayathena
Jul 21, 2012

everydayathena thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

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jabey
Jun 10, 2008

jabey thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

Summary

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jlapham
Oct 02, 2013

Do Androids dream of electric sheep? Do androids dream at all? Do they hope for something better? Humans have dreams and hopes, and humans have empathy. How and why have these traits come about? Research on this can be found, yet here, Dick has explored what happens when these traits are missing. How cold logic and curiosity can take over, and how when the pain in others does not register, or the pleasure for that matter, lead ultimately to worse and deadly choices. Can a person live without these qualities? Would they be condemned by their peers? What happens when we remove the spider's legs? Does it make a difference if the spider is artificial? I personally was intrigued when a discussion about judgment came up, or at least it did in my mind. A being exists which is pure acceptance, and lacking in judgment. Lacking judgment allows for a more clear perception of the worald, and a release from stress. What happens when this point is reached, and can it be reversed? Can a mind go from complete numbing acceptance to the strong opinion and emotional reactiveness which seems more common to human nature. If you, or anyone, lacked empathy, how would you go about testing for its existence in others? At some point, though we may recognize the pain of another, most people have committed some act at the painful expense of someone else. So, then, does empathy only give recognition of feeling? Are some more susceptible to their empathic sense than others? I would imagine so; in fact, I'm sure I've observed this. If your arrival to this work was due to watching the film Blade Runner do not expect too much similarity. Certainly, many of the characters and ideas, and even at times the plot, seem to go with the film, but ultimately it is quite a different experience. The landscape of Dick's future is hard and polluted. So much so that it can take lives, and souls. Try not to let the imagery of the film be the backdrop when you read, for it is not quite the same. And, in order to prolong the inevitable build-up of kipple, I suggest checking this book out from the library so that you can return it before it breaks down... Then again, I would consider one worth keeping in the personal collection.

Notices

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d
DavidB
May 10, 2009

Sexual Content: "Copulation with an android; absolutely against the law, here and on the colony worlds as well."

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