Pornland

Pornland

How Porn Has Hijacked Our Sexuality

Book - 2010
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Professor Gail Dines has written about and researched the porn industry for over two decades. She attends industry conferences, interviews producers and performers, and speaks to hundreds of men and women each year about their experience with porn. Students and educators describe her work as "life changing."

In Pornland --the culmination of her life's work--Dines takes an unflinching look at porn and its affect on our lives. Astonishingly, the average age of first viewing porn is now 11.5 years for boys, and with the advent of the Internet, it's no surprise that young people are consuming more porn than ever. But, as Dines shows, today's porn is strikingly different from yesterday's Playboy . As porn culture has become absorbed into pop culture, a new wave of entrepreneurs are creating porn that is even more hard-core, violent, sexist, and racist. To differentiate their products in a glutted market, producers have created profitable niche products--like teen sex, torture porn, and gonzo--in order to entice a generation of desensitized users.

Going from the backstreets to Wall Street, Dines traces the extensive money trail behind this multibillion-dollar industry--one that reaps more profits than the film and music industries combined. Like Big Tobacco--with its powerful lobbying groups and sophisticated business practices--porn companies don't simply sell products. Rather they influence legislators, partner with mainstream media, and develop new technologies like streaming video for cell phones. Proving that this assembly line of content is actually limiting our sexual freedom, Dines argues that porn's omnipresence has become a public health concern we can no longer ignore.

Going from the backstreets to Wall Street, Dines reveals how porn is affecting our lives and why its omnipresence is detrimental to our sexual freedom.
Publisher: Boston : Beacon Press, c2010
ISBN: 9780807044520
0807044520
9780807001547
Branch Call Number: 363.470973 D5838p 2010
Characteristics: xxxi, 204 p. ; 24 cm

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1
1aa
Jul 28, 2016

"[...] people construct their notions of reality from the media they consume, and the more consistent and coherent the message, the more people believe it to be true." (pg., 162), referring to Gerbner, "Cultivation Analysis..." in 'Mass Communication And Society 1 no.3 (1998): p. 175-94.

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Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

"I suspect that the reason many men reject the opportunity to ask reflective questions [about porn use] is that they don't want to end up in pain, despairing about how porn affects their sexuality, relationships, and interactions with women. Moving out of the porn world's tightly controlled version of reality and into a space where one has to delve inside for an emotional stocktaking of porn's impact on the body and mind is not easy. For most of their lives, the culture told men that pornography is fun and harmless and all about fantasy. [...] [T]hese are not 'fantasies' constructed in the head of each individual porn user, based on his own creative imagination, past histories, longings, and experiences, but highly formulaic, factory-line images created by a savvy group of capitalists."

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Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

"[P]ornography, like most media images, creates a world that, on some level, we know is not true. But it is an enormous leap to say that because porn is not an accurate version of how things are in the world, it then has no real-world effects. [...] Imagine what would happen if suddenly we saw a slew of dramas and sitcoms on television where, say, blacks or Jews were repeatedly referred to in a racist or anti-Semitic way, where they got their hair pulled, faces slapped, and choked by white men pushing foreign objects into their mouths. My guess is that there would be an outcry and the images would not be defended on the grounds that they were just fantasy but rather would be seen for what they are: depictions of cruel acts that one group is perpetrating against another group. By wrapping the violence in a sexual cloak, porn renders it invisible, and those of us who protest the violence are consequently defined as anti-sex, not anti-violence."

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Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

"Human beings develop their identity and sense of reality out of the stories the culture tells, and while pornography is not the only producer of stories about sex, relationships, and sexuality, it is possibly the most powerful. [...] By placing porn use within a cultural context, we can begin to see how powerful it really is. As boys grow up to be men, they are inundated with messages from the media, messages that both objectify women's bodies and depict women as sex objects who exist for male pleasure. These images are part and parcel of the visual landscape and hence are unavoidable. They come at boys and men from video games, movies, television, ads, and men's magazines, and they supply them with a narrative about women, men, and sexuality. What porn does is to take these cultural messages about women and present them in a succinct way that leaves little room for multiple interpretations."

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1
1aa
Jul 28, 2016

A clearly written and decently enough argued book about modern pornography in the USA nowadays. Numerous angles are used: business, the viewer's psychology, social conditions (including racism, incest, and paedophilia). Numerous notes from an array of sources. Where the argument is weak is where she gives anecdotes from her own lectures, anecdotal quotations from porn fan chat forums, and where she totally omits any mention of the legal records (if some of what she says is true, the contracts signed would lack validity), and - for a sociologist! - lacks statistical evidence. What worries me is that she started her own organization (Stop Porn Culture) with two lecture texts plus slide shows to educate/advocate; its been going for five years, but there is still no advances made in this policy area.

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Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

Gail Dines' book Pornland delves into the porn industry, a business estimated to be worth $96 billion in 2006. The story begins with soft-core porn magazines such as Playboy, and moves into discussions of gonzo, IP and PCP. What I found most striking about this narrative is that this industry seems to have become completely untouchable: pornography has become almost synonymous with a natural expression of men's sexuality. As Dines demonstrates, pornography is a capitalist enterprise which is promoting more and more extreme depictions in order to compete for market share in an increasingly saturated business environment. Critics of the industry and its products are subjected to ad hominem attacks, being lambasted as man-hating prudes. Dines' courage in writing a book of this nature is praiseworthy. Whether one is for or against the regulation of porn, one cannot ignore the marketing miracle that the pornography industry has become. Dialogue about this issue is almost non-existent in the mainstream media, which is a shame for anyone wishing to understand the "pornification" of Western culture. This book would be of interest to adult readers who enjoy business studies, media studies, sociology, or political science.

nutty7688 May 13, 2011

Feminist views on porn. Hypersexualization and looking like a porno queen are just some of ther terms used in this book. Not very exciting, and I could not complete.

Notices

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1
1aa
Jul 28, 2016

Coarse Language: There are very many graphic descriptions of sexual acts which are described using very obscene language as well the terms used by the porn industry.

s
Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

Violence: This book contains some graphic depictions of violence.

s
Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

Sexual Content: Given the topic, this book contains sexual content.

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Sandy_102
Mar 06, 2012

Sandy_102 thinks this title is suitable for 18 years and over

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