Ayako

Ayako

Book - 2010
Average Rating:
2
2
1
Rate this:
Osamu Tezuka, godfather of manga, here defies the conventions of his manga by utilising a completely original cast and relying solely on historical drama to drive the plot. Ayako pulls no punches and does not allow for gimmicks as science-fiction or fantasy may. Instead, Tezuka weaves together a tale which at its core simply focuses on a single family, a family that could be considered a metaphor for a rapidly developing superpower. Overflowing with imagery of the cold war seen through Japan's eyes, this monumental tale is regarded as Tezuka's most political work.
Publisher: New York : Vertical, 2010
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9781934287514
1934287512
Branch Call Number: GN TEZUKA 2010
Characteristics: 699 p. : chiefly ill. ; 21 cm

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

n
Nakkid
Dec 02, 2014

Tezuka Osamu (or Osamu Tezuka, whichever you prefer) was a groundbreaking animator and mangaka, and this can be seen in "Ayako". The artwork blew me away. The story is extremely dark and often disturbing, but the art jumped between cute and cartoony to dark and dramatic. To be able to switch back and forth between these starkly contrasting styles and yet blend them seamlessly is just incredible. I actually really liked the first half of the book. All the characters are important, and I guess Tezuka really loved horrific tragedy, cause this book is full of it, and it definitely keeps things suspenseful and interesting, while also inciting various emotions. There are some seriously twisted themes in this book, but it just makes it all the more unbearable but incredible to read coming from Tezuka. But after the first half, the story kinda shifts and the plot gets dragged around until the original plot is somewhat lost. The second half seemed to focus more on mafia crime-boss activities instead of the titular character Ayako. And in regards to Ayako, though I initially liked her character, I found myself caring less and less for her in the second half. It's like she wasn't as much of an important character, and was only important again in the very end when her presence tied up loose ends while her character didn't really do anything (I promise I'm not giving away spoilers yet). For being the titular character for the book, I feel like she never actually did much to contribute to the story, stuff just kinda...happened, and the events just seemed to surround her. What starts off as a great book ends up being a jumble of events with twisted characters. SPOILER: I don't get the ending. Some of those characters in the pit didn't deserve to die, mainly the sister and the inspector's son. They didn't do anything wrong (the sister didn't have any way of helping Ayako even though she wanted to), and I don't understand why they were punished. And where did Ayako go?? Did Tezuka not have an idea of how to conclude her character and just decided to make her disappear for the sake of having an easier ending?

d
dschonbe
Oct 18, 2011

This is an awfluy weird tale. Fun at times, it ultimately left me feeling unsatisfied.

Notices

Add Notices

n
Nakkid
Dec 02, 2014

Frightening or Intense Scenes: There are some really intense, violent scenes to highlight the cruelty of some of the characters.

n
Nakkid
Dec 02, 2014

Sexual Content: Rape is a big theme of this book. There's also a lot of nudity and sexual content, and body parts are shown in detail.

Age

Add Age Suitability

n
Nakkid
Dec 02, 2014

Nakkid thinks this title is suitable for 16 years and over

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at MCL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top