Nest, Nook & Cranny

Nest, Nook & Cranny

Poems

Book - 2010
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From tongue-in-cheek sonnets to lyrical free verse, Susan Blackaby's poems explore the many kinds of homes animals make for themselves.
Publisher: Watertown, MA : Charlesbridge, 2010
ISBN: 9781580893503
1580893503
Branch Call Number: j 577 B6279n 2010
Characteristics: viii, 48 p. : ill. ; 22 cm
Additional Contributors: Hogan, Jamie - Illustrator

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From tongue-in-cheek sonnets to lyrical free verse, Susan Blackaby's poems explore the many kinds of homes animals make for themselves.


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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Dec 09, 2012

Poetry for children enjoys a freedom that poetry for adults lack. Adults may enjoy the way that language trips off the tongue, but in the course of these pleasures they are rarely allowed to teach and inform through verse. In the realm of children’s literature, however, there’s a freedom. If a poet wanted to, they could cover any subject they wanted to and teach about it accordingly. Of course, it’s only the accomplished poets who strike the right balance between being instructive and being poetic. Susan Blackaby, with the help of artist Jamie Hogan, manages this difficult balance. Nest, Nook and Cranny is therefore a slim little title, but one that in some ways covers the subject of different natural environments better than many of the rote, dull, fact-filled tomes that line library shelves nationwide. A delightful collection, no matter if you shelve it in your environmental section or your poetic one.

l
LZLibrary
Apr 11, 2011

An exploration of both animal homes and poetic forms and devices - perfect for National Poetry Month, school projects or simply reading aloud for enjoyment!

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Dec 09, 2012

ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 9 and 12

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ELIZABETH RAMSEY BIRD Dec 09, 2012

Desert, Grassland, Shoreline, Wetland, and Woodland. Meet five different habitats, home to an untold wealth of animals, bugs and variegated critters. In the “Before You Begin” section at the start, Ms. Blackaby freely acknowledges that the animals she ascribes to one environment or another sometimes mean bupkiss. “Thanks to accommodations or adaptations or both, some creatures can live anyplace.” That taken care of, she plunges into the poems. Using everything from villanelles to free verse, triolets to cinquains, Blackaby gives each habitat its own special feel. We read about a “dreamy home for beavers feeling dozy” or secluded places from “sandy strand to rocky scarp”. There are great lumbering bears emerging in the spring and coyotes that “hunt for jumpy prey” before becoming “jumpy prey” themselves. The end of the book contains a section of facts on different habitats and a Writing Poetry section that takes each poem and describes it at length.

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