The Year-round Vegetable Gardener

The Year-round Vegetable Gardener

How to Grow your Own Food 365 Days A Year No Matter Where You Live

Book - 2012
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Even in winter's coldest months you can harvest fresh, delicious produce. Drawing on insights gained from years of growing vegetables in Nova Scotia, Niki Jabbour shares her simple techniques for gardening throughout the year. Learn how to select the best varieties for each season, the art of succession planting, and how to build inexpensive structures to protect your crops from the elements. No matter where you live, you'll soon enjoy a thriving vegetable garden year-round.
Publisher: North Adams, Mass. : Storey Pub., [2012]
ISBN: 9781603425681
1603425683
1603429921
9781603429924
Branch Call Number: 635 J118y 2012
Characteristics: vii, 247 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm

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From Library Staff

Year-round gardener and writer Niki Jabbour shares her secrets for growing food during every month of the year. Her season-defying techniques, developed in her own home garden where short summers and low levels of winter sunlight create the ultimate challenge, are doable, affordable, and rewardin... Read More »


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This book is wonderful for the person who would like to garden all year round - even in our Canadian winters! It's loaded with information, it's easy to read and there are loads of glossy, coloured pictures. Beautiful, and useful, book.

m
Miville
Sep 27, 2012

Very useful - my husband and I have built our first polytunnel for the winter, and I consulted the book multiple times. The author provides so much information, I had to go and buy the book.

r
rgally
Mar 25, 2012

Useful, informative, educational information about extending your growing season no matter where you live.

This is a book to buy and refer to many times throughout the year

DanniOcean Feb 23, 2012

reviewed in Stratford Gazette

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DanniOcean Feb 23, 2012

This has been the most unusual winter in recent memory and the milder-than-normal temperatures may have you itching to get gardening, especially with the Garden Show coming up next weekend, the hyacinths blooming in supermarkets, and the media constantly spreading the gospel of the local-sustainable-food movement. This is just the book to get you plotting a new vegetable garden, one that can sustain you through all the seasons including an average snow-belt-type winter. Its subtitle is “How to Grow Your Own Food 365 Days a Year No Matter Where You Live”. It is a big claim, but seeing as how the author and her garden live in Nova Scotia, I think we can assume her methods will work in Southern Ontario. And according to the author, mid-March is a great time to get the first cool-harvest seeds in prepared soil, so pick up some carrot, radish, asparagus, lettuce, kale, chard and chive seeds. Next, get ready for some intensive planting, methods used by Mediterranean farmers to ensure non-stop harvests. Jabbour provides marvellous pictures of the types of soil ‘amendments’, sowing techniques, frames, incubators, plot designs, pests (and antidotes) and especially the mouth-watering harvests she has pulled from her 4-season garden. The entire second half of the book is devoted to the types of crops and edibles that can be grown in our climates, from asparagus to winter squash and a few new-sounding varieties in between (lemon cucumber or kohlrabi, anyone?). This is a handy, colourful, well-organized gardening text is a must-have for anyone wishing to grow their own produce, or anyone who just loves gardening. The photos of her ‘snow-garden’ will have you yearning for next winter, just to be able to pick your own arugula in January. Imagine!

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