The Bradbury Report

The Bradbury Report

A Novel

eBook - 2010
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Destined to take its place beside such classics of speculative fiction as 1984, Brave New World, and The Handmaid’s Tale, this astonishing first novel is a beautifully written and riveting meditation on what it means to be human, what it means to live, and love, wholeheartedly. The year is 2071. In the United States, the only nation in the world where human cloning is legal, a government-run cloning program is in place as the lynchpin of the health care delivery system. Almost every U.S. citizen has a “Copy” living in a sequestered area called The Clearances. When an “Original” is sick or injured and requires surgery, whatever he needs is taken from his clone. In the two decades since the program’s inception, no person has ever seen his Copy, and no clone has ever successfully escaped. Until now. A widower in his sixties, and an unlikely candidate for adventure, Ray gets a call from a woman he has not seen or spoken to since their days together as students. Anna is now a member of an underground abolitionist group, and she asks Ray’s help in hiding an escaped clone. Ray is unwilling, until he learns the clone is his. The Bradbury Report is Ray’s account of the journey he, Anna, and his clone – a perfect replica of himself at twenty-one – undertake on the run from the authorities. It is an epic journey, and an exploration of one of the most pressing ethical dilemmas of the twenty-first century. A provocative vision of the American future, and a haunting story of love and friendship and self-discovery, The Bradbury Report will stay with you long after reading.
Publisher: 2010
Branch Call Number: OverDrive ebook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc

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stormy1960
Oct 24, 2012

I could not get past the first 30 pages of turgid writing. Maybe he was trying to emulate someone who was not a writer. If so, well done....

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Kikko1776
Jun 04, 2011

I think Steven Polansky could be an ethical advocate for the protection of clones. The story tells a dark side of human nature. Even clones have feelings too. After I read this, I thought about that song 'Why can't We be Friends' by War and U2's 'Miss Sarajevo' and 'Mothers Of The Disappeared'. One final thought, my clone and I would be bar buddies and go hang out at Game Works playing the Street Fighters game or Marios.

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