Church in Anglo-Saxon Society

Church in Anglo-Saxon Society

eBook - 2005
Rate this:
England. - ;...an impressive study of the English church before the Norman Conquest which sheds much new light on its structures and place in society - Contemporary Review;a powerful and compelling synthesis...Blair's skilful integration of archaeological and historical evidence is second to none. His synthesis and assessment of the most recent archaeological research conveys all the excitement of this fast unfolding field - John Nightingale, Magdalen College, Oxford;This book is a major breakthrough in our understanding of English religious history. - Contemporary Review;A comprehensive study...John Blair's eloquent presentation of the evidence will doubtless hold the field for a generation, and is likely to define debate for even longer. - Richard Gameson, TLS;...it is a testament to Blair's skills as a writer and researcher that this book will be the first port of call for many years to come. - Martin Ryan, Landscape History, Vol. 28.
From the impact of the first monasteries in the seventh century, to the emergence of the local parochial system five hundred years later, the Church was a force for change in Anglo-Saxon society. It shaped culture and ideas, social and economic behaviour, and the organization of landscape and settlement. In this innovative study, John Blair brings together written, topographical, and archaeological evidence to build a multi-dimensional picture of what local churches and local. communities meant to each other in early England. - ;From the impact of the first monasteries in the seventh century, to the emergence of the local parochial system five hundred years later, the Church was a force for change in Anglo-Saxon society. It shaped culture and ideas, social and economic behaviour, and the organization of landscape and settlement. This book traces how the widespread foundation of monastic sites ('minsters') during c.670-730 gave the recently pagan English new ways of living, of exploiting their resources, and. of absorbing European culture, as well as opening new spiritual and intellectual horizons. Through the era of Viking wars, and the tenth-century reconstruction of political and economic life, the minsters gradually lost their wealth, their independence, and their role as sites of high culture, but. grew in stature as foci of local society and eventually towns. After 950, with the increasing prominence of manors, manor-houses, and village communities, a new and much larger category of small churches were founded, endowed, and rebuilt: the parish churches of the emergent eleventh- and twelfth-century local parochial system. In this innovative study, John Blair brings together written, topographical, and archaeological evidence to build a multi-dimensional picture of what local churches and. local communities meant to each other in early
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, UK, 2005
Copyright Date: ©2005
ISBN: 9780191518836
9780198226956
Branch Call Number: Electronic book
Characteristics: 1 online resource (625 pages)
Additional Contributors: ProQuest (Firm)

Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

There are no comments for this title yet.

Age

Add Age Suitability

There are no ages for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at MCL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top